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humanities & 
puttie t?Qlicy 

^^^glurr^e 2, No. 1 June/July 



PEOPLE PROJECTS 



Julian Bond Keynotes "A Discussion of Values" 



The question, "Is 
years away?" was 



1984 just seven 
the topic of 
discussion for a two-day conference 
called "A Discussion of Values: What 
Can Be". In the May 13th opening 
session Robert Corrigan, chairman of the 
Maryland Committee for the Humanities, 
introduced Dominic Fornaro, president 
of the Maryland-DC. AFL-CIO, Garry 
Messinger, from the National 
Endowment for the Humanities and Paul 
Sarbanes, U.S. Senator from Maryland, 
the first speakers of the conference. 

Sen. Sarbanes said that as 1984 ap- 
proaches, Americans need to "focus 
again" on the fundamental principles on 
which our country was founded. "We 
tend to take for granted that what we've 
been able to make work over a sustained 
period of time will continue to work in 
the future, and that's an assumption that 
recent experience has shown us is not 
one we can lightly make," he said. 

Walter Orlinsky, project director, 
introduced Julian Bond whose address, 



"What's Next," focused on the past and 
future of black Americans. 

"In the last 114 years since Abraham 
Lincoln freed the slaves, the fortune of 
black Americans has risen only to fall 
again, much like the opposite ends of a 
seesaw," Julian Bond said. He noted 
that while the general condition of black 
Americans has improved a great deal, 
their relative condition has actually 
managed to get worse. 

"Today's tragedy is not just that things 
remain pretty much the same (for black 
Americans), but that the removal over 
the 1960's of the more blatant forms of 
American apartheid have made it too 
easy for too many to believe them to 
have been radically altered for the 
better," he said. "Nothing in fact could 
be further from the truth " 

"Now in Washington," Mr. Bond said, 
"the pattern is being set for what the 
next four or eight years may bring. The 
battle now ought to shift toward 
achieving the economic democracy so 




Robert Corrigan, chairman of MCH and Maria Heyssel, executive director, attend 
conference. 




Julian Bond answers questions after 
opening session. 

long denied most Americans, which has 
relegated black Americans to being a 
mere permanent underclass." 

For Mr Bond, "An Orwellian 1984 is 
here now in a society where all are 
equal, but some more equal than 
others " He called for the recognition of 
the great pool of black American talent 
which "is still hidden and buried by 
the lack of education, encouragement 
and opportunity ." 

The areas of focus for the conference, 
education, art and culture, freedom and 
justice, and work, were introduced in 
the opening session Speaking on 
education, Steven Muller, president of 
Johns Hopkins University, defined two 
problems that face educational in- 
stitutions today: the "climate of 
unreason" and loss of values within 
modern or scientific universities, and 
the rejection of youth by the 20th 
Century technological society. 

See Bond, page 2 



Newsletter of the Maryland Committee for the Humanities and Public Policy 



^ 




Walter Orlinsky, program director and president of the 
Baltimore City Council, discusses opening session. Mr. 
Orlinsky conceived the idea for "A Discussion of 
Values," which became the final achievement of the 
Baltimore City Bicentennial Commission. 



Committee Notes. 



The Maryland Committee is seeking new members to replace 
Committee members whose terms will be completed in 
October. Maria Heyssel, executive director of the Maryland 
Committee, is encouraging people with a special interest in the 
humanities to apply. 

"We're looking for people with particular interest in the 
humanities, who are scholars, public representatives from 
business, labor and neighborhood groups." 

Committee member duties include reading proposals, at- 
tending approximately five day-long meetings a year, and 
attending special conferences. It is the responsibility of the 
Committee members to vote on proposals submitted for grants. 

"By carefully selecting proposals for People Projects, the 
Committee members perform a major service by providing 
Maryland's public with programs in the humanities," Ms. 
Heyssel said. 

Those interested in applying should forward their resumes to 
the Membership Committee, C/O Maryland Committee for the 
Humanities, 330 North Charles St. Room 306, Baltimore, Md. 
21201. 



Northeastern States Discuss 
New Guidelines 

On April 11th and 12th, the administration of the nor- 
theastern state-based program met in New Brunswick, New 
Jersey to discuss the implications of the new federal guidelines 
and the program's daily operations. The new law states that 
state-based committees may fund humanities projects which do 
not necessarily focus on public policy issues, and that 
governors may appoint two members to the states' committees 
(and contribute state funds if they desire). 

Since the impact of the legislation has the potential to 
change the nature and function of the state-based program, twc 
program officers from the National Endowment for the 
Humanities and 18 administrators from the northeastern states 
committee met to come to grips with this new image. 

The second day's agenda was concerned with administrative 
operations, such as application procedure, program 
development ideas, fiscal operations, and the management study 
by which states will assess and redefine their operations. 

This conference, as others before it, gathered unique people 
together to share their programs' similarities and idiosyncrasies. 



$600,000 Available 



The National Endowment for the Humanities has awarded th( 
Maryland Committee for the Humanities (MCH) a grant ol 
$600,000 to regrant to non-profit groups and institutions for 
public humanities programs within the state. 

Over the next eighteen months, this money will be used to 
support up to 50 percent of the total cost of projects selectee 
by the MCH on the basis of proposals submitted to the Com- 
mittee. All funds will be for humanities projects, better known 
as PEOPLE PROJECTS, which involve scholars in the humanities 
and the public. 

NEW GUIDELINES and program information are available 
Telephone (301) 837-1938 or write the MCH, 330 N. Charles St., 
Room 306, Baltimore, Md. 21201. 

NEXT DEADLINE-August 5, 1977 for September con- 
sideration. 

Bond, from page 1 

Gerald Johnson, art critic and author who spoke on art and 
culture, noted that he is a resident of the "no mean city" and 
that the contributions Baltimore has made to the arts have 
largely been ignored by the rest of the country. 

Speaking on freedom and justice, Michael Kelly, dean of the 
University of Maryland School of Law, said that while one of 
the most "pervasive movements" in our society is 
professionalism, professionals, particularly legal and medical 
professionals, are not exploring the needs of the people they 
are supposed to reach. Garry Wills, syndicated columnist who 
spoke on work, turned to the writings of John Ruskin to discuss 
the dehumanizing and deadening nature of most work today. 

The conference, which was held on the campus of Johns 
Hopkins University, was sponsored by the Maryland Committee 
for the Humanities, the Baltimore Bicentennial Commission and 
Johns Hopkins University. 



The Newsletter for the Maryland Committee for the Humanities 

is a bimonthly publication. For extra copies or further in- 
formation, telephone (301) 837-1938 or write MCH, 330 N. 
Charles St., Room 306, Baltimore, Md. 21201. 

Editor: Barbara Barbiero 



IS 1984 JUST SEVEN YEARS AWAY? 




On Work: 
Leon Sullivan 



Rev. Leon Sullivan believes 
that America is faced with a 
crisis in the area of work which 
is more significant than the 
energy crisis spelled out by 
President Carter. 

If new methods are not found 
to motivate new productivity 
and a "spirit of industry" soon, 
he said, "...the free enterprise 
system will no longer exist as 
we know it today." 

There must be a rekindling of 
the "spirit" of work that will 
produce the kind of innovation, 
inspiration and motivation 
towards productivity that Rev. 
Sullivan observed in Japan and 
China. "If this is not done, the 
Soviet Union (and others) will 
bury us with its industry and 
productivity," he said. 
Rev. Sullivan noted that there is a need to provide future 
workers with new skills. Jobs created by new technologies will 
require new talents. "No longer will you be able to make your 
way carrying loads on your back. They will be jobs that require 
application of mind and hand," he said. 

The skills of the aged can and must provide a vital con- 
tribution to the future productivity of America. Rev. Sullivan 
said that the greatest mental resource in this country, people 
between the ages of 57 and 71, remains unused. "OIC 
(Opportunities Industrialization Centers) relates more and more 
to those who are called older because... we know the capability 
of those who retire to do significant work is much greater than 
ever assessed a few years ago," he said. 

Rev. Sullivan, who is pastor of Philadelphia's Zion Baptist 
Church, founded OIC which had trained more than 60,000 
disadvantaged people in some 90 cities. 



Rev. Leon Sullivan 





Rev. Leon Sullivan, left, joins discussion on work. 



Jonathan Kozol leads discussion group on education. 

On Education: Jonathan Kozol 

"The problem with public schools," explained Jonathan 
Kozol, "is not that they don't work well, the problem is they 
do." 

"The U.S. public school systems have done a good job in 
producing manageable voters, manipulable consumers, and in 
the case of war, willing killers. In that sense we've done an 
excellent job," he said. 

"It is not a mistake when public schools in rich suburban 
neighborhoods turn out hollow and despairing men. .and 
... schools that serve the children of the poor turn out, time 
and again, a powerless labor pool of unskilled men." This Kozol 
said has been the historic function of public schools;a function 
that has been lived-up to all too well. 

Mr. Kozol called for a turn around in the public school 
system. "It's an ideal time now, in this period of the Bicen- 
tennial," he said, "to ask ourselves why on earth we, you and I, 
lack the guts, the power or the leverage to turn around the 150 
year function of the public schools." The school systems should 
be seeking to educate strong, ethical individuals first and 
"docile" citizens second. "If we do the first job right, we'll find 
that the second has been done for us," he said. Our education 
system has made the mistake of convincing the inevitability of 
progress and the "contributions" past generations have brought 
to the stable, satisfactory world today, he said. 

It is also too devoted to "conflict resolution." "We teach kids 
at a very early age to deny their real convictions," he said. We 
teach them to state convictions "as if they don't quite believe 
them and in so doing we deny all probability of them arriving at 
new truths." 

"Whether we make the appeal on ethical grounds," he said, 
"or whether we make it on grounds of just plain old-fashioned, 
patriotic American self-interest, it seems that it's time to take 
our role in history and turn the schools to serve a function they 
have never served before." 




From Left to right, Barbara Hetrick, moderator, Michael Brock- 
meyer, panelist, Jude Dougherty, moderator, and Raoul Berger 
discuss justice. 

On Justice: Raoul Berger 

Law and justice do not always coincide. For Raoul Berger, it 
is the law, not justice, which should be maintained above all 
costs 

"Ours is a government of laws and not of men," he said- "For 
this reason I suggest judges are not required to take an oath to 
do justice, but rather to support the Constitution. If the 
Constitution enables them to deal out justice, fine, but they 
can't rise above the Constitution to do so." 

Mr. Berger, a legal historian and expert on the historical 
significance of the Constitution, said that while the Supreme 
Court under Chief Justice Warren Burger is now engaged in a 
withdrawal of some of the Warren Court's civil liberty 
decisions, these decisions had been based on justice and not 
the law. "The Supreme Court is not authorized to amend the 
Constitution, even for the noblest of causes. The end does not 
justify the means," he said. 

Decisions made in the Warren Court, which Mr. Berger said 
bent the law, were tantamount to usurpation. "The founding 
fathers struggled to guarantee a written constitution "...to make 
certain that men would be governed by law, not the arbitrary 
fiat of the man or men in power," he said. 

"This test of Constitutionality is not whether we like the 
result, or the court likes the result, but whether the given power 
was granted." 



On Freedom: Aryeh Neier 

For Aryeh Neier, executive director of the American Civil 
Liberties Union, one of the greatest challenges the American 
public has in trying to preserve freedom is ensuring that the 
public controls the government and not vice versa. 

One major problem in ensuring public control of the 
government, Mr. Neier believes, is the increasing amount of 
information the government is able to gather on its citizens and 
the decreasing amount of information citizens are able to 
gather on the government. 

"The ordinary bureaucratic process of withholding in- 
formation is something which infects government 
bureaucracies. They do not operate open to public scrutiny," 
Mr. Neier said. 

The increase in crime has led to an abdication by the public 
of certain freedoms in order to be protected. "So much of the 
effort to cut back on civil liberties comes very naturally 
because people are terrified of crime. This inspires proposals to 
enhance the powers of police... and courts to look away when 
they see police practices which offend them." Mr. Neier said 



that civil libertarians should be insisting that law enforcement 
officers devote themselves to crimes that involve victims. "Of 
some nine million arrests last year, one half were for victimless 
crimes," he said. 

There is also the need to restore full citizenship to all persons 
who have been traditionally disenfranchised because of sex, 
race or status. Although a great deal of progress has been made 
in this area, "there is a long way to go," Mr. Neier said. 
"Unfortunately, some of the impetus for progress in these last 
decades no longer seems to exist. The progress has come largely 
from the people who were directly affected." 

For Aryeh Neier, "It is important to maintain faith in 
freedom, to insist that the problems we face may be very large 
problems, but dealing with those problems is... something that 
we ought to turn to, rather than any abandonment of our faith 
in individual freedom. 



On Ait Charles Parkhurst 



Corporations and the federal government, and not individual 
donors, will provide the major part of future art patronage in 
the United States. 

Charles Parkhurst, assistant director of the National 
Gallery, believes that although the U.S. tax system has had the 
greatest impact on past art patronage in the country, present 
tax laws and regulations do not promote such patronage. 
"Without deductible gifts," he said, "the arts programs in this 
country would be today, somewhere between total neglect and 
shabby utility." 

However, private patrons of the arts are becoming fewer and 
federal funds are increasing. Mr. Parkhurst said that the federal 
government began to support the arts 14 years ago with $3 
million. This figure has risen to more than $100 million per 
year. 

"This is bound to affect the course of art history in this 
country, when the money-hungry arts bend their grant ap- 
plications to fit requirements which are set for making grants," 
he said. "Though (this) may not be a deliberate kind of control, 
it seems an almost inevitable kind under these circumstances." 

Mr. Parkhurst said that museums are still apprehensive about 
purse string control and purchase few works of art with public 
money. He said that it is the artist who is most affected now. 
The key is to insulate the grant giving process from political 
interference, according to Mr. Parkhurst. "Government and 
corporate largesses are generally impersonal and that may be 
the salvation of grant recipients for the arts." Parkhurst noted 
that the great reserve of corporate money has just begun to be 
tapped. 




Conference participants discuss the program over coffee. 




Prof. Joseph Weizenbaum 

Is Technology Encroaching on Life? 

The simple truth, said Joseph Weizenbaum, is that "modern 
technology and modern science are largely devoted to the 
annihilation of the most fundamental of human rights-the right 
to life itself."* 

Speaking to the dinner audience during the "Discussion of 
Values" conference, Joseph Weizenbaum, professor of com- 
puter science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
considered the question of whether or not technology en- 
croaches on human rights. 

For Professor Weizenbaum, the answer is a simple yes. 
Infact, technology has encroached so much on our rights that it 
has become a "life destroying" rather than a "life supporting" 
force. "Large-scale science and technology today... is mainly in 
the service of killing people," he said. 

This encroachment, gives rise to ethical questions, Prof. 
Weizenbaum said. "And ethics is about nothing so much as it is 
about renunciation." Technology is itself controlled by people, 
Prof. Weizenbaum said. "Computers are the way they are not 
because there is some independent autonomous force that 
controls them," he said. "There are social, political and 
financial processes at work that influence technology." 

"Only individuals can say no," he said. "It's false to believe 
that the worker has no choice." Every worker, from those who 
design antipersonnel weapons, to those who pack them for 
shipping, must know what he is doing. Not to be able to control 
the inputs to one's life "...is to confess to having become a 
machine," Professor Weizenbaum said. 

Joseph Weizenbaum, who has been at MIT since 1963, has 
spent his career working with computers. In his book, Com- 
puter Power and Human Reason," published last year, he takes 
up the topic of the relationship between computer and human 
thought and the danger inherent in pursuing artificial in- 
telligence. 

* Professor Weizenbaum noted that by "right to life" he did 
not refer to the abortion issue, but to the right to life for all 
mankind. 



"The Remarkable Mr. Pennypacker" 
comes to the Inner Harbor 

Mr. Pennypackerwas indeed remarkable; a "free thinker" of 
the 1890's who created his own values and lived by them. These 
values included bigamy-Mr. Pennypacker was father to two 
families in two cities. 

Villa Julie College presented the play, "The Remarkable Mr. 
Pennypacker, "at Baltimore's Inner Harbor, May 22. It was the 
second play dealing with the role of the father in society and 
was funded by the Maryland Committee for the Humanities. 

While bigamy of the sort discussed in "The Remarkable Mr. 
Pennypacker" is uncommon in our times, every year thousands 
of bigamists are prosecuted in the courts-most for marrying a 
second wife without having divorced the first. 

But "Mr. Pennypacker" raised issues tangentially related to 
bigamy-what constitutes a good father, the difficulty inherent 
in living by values that inevitably conflict with values followed 
by society, and the close relationships everyone has with others 
and the problem of devoting the amount of time necessary to 
these relationships. 

"Mr. Pennypacker" was part of Villa Julie College's Fine Arts 
Festival. 



Banneker Film Nears Completion 

The story of Benjamin Banneker, "the first black man of 
science," is now in its final months of production. The hour- 
long, dramatized documentary entitled "The Man Who Loved 
the Stars" is expected to be completed this summer. 

Ossie Davis, who plays Benjamin Banneker, the astronomer, 
writer and self-educated mathematician, has been filming 
scenes on location in Maryland, Washington, D.C., Penn- 
sylvania and Virginia. 

To bring Banneker's achievements more immediately to the 
attention of a modern audience, the scenario is in the form of a 
discussion with a present-day interviewer. The role of the in- 
terviewer is currently being negotiated. 

The film, which is funded, in part, by the Maryland Com- 
mittee for the Humanities, will be previewed on WMAR-TV and 
broadcast nationally on public television in the fall. 




Ossie Davis as Benjamin Banneker and Ron David as Major 
Ellicott in a scene from "The Man Who Loved the Stars." 



Upcoming People Projects.- 

Deal Island Area-Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow. The Deal Island 
Regional Committee. Craig Edward Webster (301) 784-2103. 
"Horizons," the third and final assembly in this series of town 
meetings concerning Deal Island's third century goals will focus 
on the key economic, political and social issues of the area. It 
will take place in June. Guidelines will be developed for the 
future goals of Deal Island. The three town meetings will be 
recorded in a slide show with sound to preserve the events as a 
part of the local heritage and a "people's plan" or written 
document containing suggestions for the future will be drafted. 
Contact Craig Webster for information on the date, time and 
place of this final town meeting. 

Sugarloaf Regional Trails Historic Landscape Interpretation. 

Sugarloaf Regional Trails. Dr. Frederick Cutheim (301) 926- 
4510. The final conference of this extended project of 
workshops and field trips dealing with the environmental, 
ecological and ethical questions that relate to historic trails and 
landscapes of these regional trails will be held in June. This last 
program called "Three Aternatives for the Countryside" will 
summarize the alternatives that have been presented in past 
programs. This final session will be held on June 16, from 5-9 
p.m., at Stronghold Mansion, Dickerson, Md. 

The Town Meeting. Antioch College. Reginald T. Williams 
(301) 730-9175. Plans are being formulated for this series of 
town meetings which is to be held in Columbia and will provide 
a monthly forum where residents of Columbia and Howard 
County can discuss relevant human issues which have an 
impact on the quality of life. In preparation for these meetings, 
there will be a booth called "Suggestion Box" at the Columbia 
Birthday Fair from June 21-July 5 in downtown Columbia to 
collect ideas for the town meeting series. 

Columbia Forum. The Columbia Foundation. Llewellyn 
Woolford (301) 730-1839. The Columbia Forum, "Columbia 
Revisited," will involve five members of the original Columbia 
Work Croup commissioned in the 1960's to plan the new city, 



who will join with a panel of persons drawn from local village 
boards, schools, health institutions, community and govern- 
ment organizations to discuss the quality of life in Columbia 
after its first ten years. The Columbia Forum will be the first 
event in the birthday celebration and will be held on June 21, at 
8 p m., at the Rouse Company Building, Little Patuxent Pkwy. 
Columbia, Md. 

An In-depth View of the Ethos of the City. Morgan State 
University. Dr. Robert L. Gill (301) 444-3247. This three-day 
symposium will examine what constitutes a "good" life in urban 
areas in an era of technological change. It will attempt to 
describe and define how the city, as a community, maximizes 
the opportunities for the exchange of ideas, issues, thoughts 
and current approaches to the solution of many of its problems. 
It will attempt to describe what is a healthy urban community 
and the kinds of knowledge required to reach such an 
assessment. Historians, philosophers, jurists, logicians, artists, 
social scientists and citizens will be involved in this dialogue. 
The symposium will be held June 23, 24 and 25 from 1-4 p.m. 
and 6-9 p.m. in Jenkins Hall, Room 103 on the Morgan State 
University campus in Baltimore, Md. 

From Log Cabin to Castle: The Evolution of Architectural 
Dwellings in Mt. Savage, Neighborhood Council of Mt. Savage. 
Robert J. Parker (301) 689-3776. The final program of this 
project which has examined the design of dwellings in Mt. 
Savage and the societal, cultural and aesthetic qualities which 
influence their style, will include a bus tour of historic sites, a 
community tea and a tour of the Castle in Mt. Savage. Also 
materials assembled during the course of the project will be 
presented to the city. All interested in this Saturday, June 11 
program should contact Mrs. Alice Carney at (301) 264-4175. 



Video tapes of "A Discussion of Values: What Can Be" will be 
available for use in September. Contact the Maryland Com- 
mittee office at [301] 837-1938 for more information. 



The Maryland Committee for the Humanities and Public Policy 
330 North Charles St., Rm. 306 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



Dr. Robert A. Corrigan, Chairman 

Mr. Herbert B. Cahan, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. P. William Filby, Fiscal Officer 

Mr George E. Allen 

Mrs. Margaret D. Armstrong 

Ms Mary Combs Barber 

Dr. John B. Boles 

Dr. Frederick Breitenfeld, Jr. 

Mr. Edwin Castagna 

Dr. Thomas R. Cripps 

Mrs. Raymond Palmer Delano, Jr. 

Mr. David C. Driskell 

Mrs. Mae E. Dyson 

Mr. John M. Klaus 

Mr. B. Nathaniel Knight 

Dr. Maurice Mandelbaum 

Dr. Samuel L. Myers 

Dr. Melvin D. Palmer 

Mr. H. Michael Ryan, Jr. 

Dr. Carolyn Reid Wallace 

Dr. William H. Wroten, Jr. 

Maria Heyssel, Executive Director 

Patricia L. Hunt, Assistant Director 






NON-Profit Org. 


U.S. Postage 


PAID 


Baltimore, Md. 


Permit No. 6371 




^o Univoroi Ly of - 
■ Park, Hi. : 



humanities & 
public policy 



PEOPLE PROJECTS 



Volume 2, No. 2 AugySept 1977 



/ 




Morgan Symposium 
Looks at the City 

Is the city a human thing? This and other questions 
attracted educators, lawyers, an architect and others to a 
three-day symposium on the city at Morgan State 
University in Baltimore. 

Funded by the Maryland Committee for the Humanities 
and sponsored by Morgan State, the symposium entitled 
"An In Depth View of the Ethos of the City," sought to 
examine cities and the people who populate them. 

The symposium, which began on June 23rd, dealt directly 
with such topics as "Baltimore at the Turn of the Century," 
"The Role and Place of Religion in an Urban Setting," "The 
Uses of History in the Planning and Revitalization Process," 
"The Cultural Life and the Life Styles of City Inhabitants," 
and "The Criminal Justice System-Myth, Illusion and 
Reality." 

Dr. Keith Melder, former associate curator at the 
Smithsonian Institute, discussed the historical significance 
of cities as responses to human needs for centers of 
"spiritual influence," physical security and economic op- 
portunities. History, he said, can and should play a vital 
role in determining the cities of the future. 

"History can identify the need for cities, some of their 
functions and some of the factors that have made them 
successful," Dr. Melder said. He explained that through 
historical preservation, "adaptive" preservation-which in- 
volves restoring old buildings to new functions-and 
historical planning-which involves evaluating the historical 
significance of policies-cities can be revitalized more 
successfully. 

Successful cities survived because they had diverse 
economics and cultures and a "sense of history," Dr. 
Melder said. They also had a "civic spirit," he said. 

Dr. Melder explained that American urban centers' 
greatest enemy has been the frame of mind of the 
American people. "Even though cities began growing faster 
than the countryside early in the 19th century, the myth of 
rural virtue and urban corruption persisted," he said. Before 
cities can be revitalized this attitude which still persists in 
the minds of the people today must be changed, he said. 

In his discussion of the cultural life and life styles of the 
city, Dr Samuel Yette, professor of journalism at Howard 




Judge Robert Bell discusses the criminal justice system. 

University and author of The Choice, discussed the 
dependency cities have on their rural counterparts. While 
rural areas can survive without cities, Dr. Yette said, cities 
cannot survive without rural areas. 

He said that a city is a dependent entity in two ways; it 
forces its citizens to depend on each other and to depend 
on the people of the rural areas. Cities tend to "erode 
individuality through their interdependent nature," he said, 
but they also require the implementation of contracts 
between people as described in John Locke's social contract 
theory. They require law and morality, he said. 

Dr. Yette said that while life in the city should not be 
romanticized to the point where its dependent qualities are 
overlooked, the city and all the problems it represents is 
the "surest test of man's ability to survive." 

He said the city is a "microcosm of the world," which 
may provide lessons for the future of mankind. 

District Court Judge Robert Bell discussed the law and 
the criminal justice system in the city. He said the biggest 
problem to be faced in urban areas is the large number of 
criminal cases that come to trial. He said that in urban 
areas where caseloads are "extremely heavy" and the 
amount of time that can be devoted to each case "ex- 
tremely limited," an average trial lasts a few minutes. Thus 
"the theory and practice in the trial of criminal cases 
differs considerably," he said. 

Judge Bell noted other problems. Disparity in sentences 

See City, page 5 



Newsletter of the Maryland Committee for the Humanities 



h 



«* 




mittees in Texas and Lousiana, especially since his ex- 
perience with the Maryland Committee was so enjoyable. "I 
thought it would be mainly just work, but it was really 
pleasant." 



Dr. John Boles 

Committee Notes.-. 

This summer the Maryland Committee for the Humanities 
is losing one of its most active and respected members. 
Dr. John B. Boles, professor of history at Towson State 
University, has accepted a one year position as visiting 
associate professor at Rice University in Texas. 

Although Dr. Boles became a Committee member only 
last September, he had been previously involved with 
projects sponsored by MCH. Dr. Boles served on the 
planning committees and participated as a panelist in past 
projects. "I was very involved in the past," Dr. Boles said, 
"and knew about the Committee when it was first formed." 

Dr. Boles said that having been a program planner and 
participant made him better able to evaluate proposals as a 
Committee member. "I knew from experience what could 
and couldn't be done," he said. "My past experience made 
me more critical." 

Born in Texas, Dr. Boles came to Maryland to teach at 
Towson State after receiving his Ph.D. in American history 
from the University of Virginia. He considers himself a 
religious historian and has specialized in the religious 
history of the southern United States. Among his many 
publications are The Great Revival, 1787-1805: The Origins 
of the Southern Evangelical Mind and Religion ' in 
Antebellum Kentucky, which focus on when and why religion 
came to the south. 

While in Maryland, Dr. Boles was also editor of the 
Maryland Historical Magazine. He will serve as acting 
editor of the journal of Southern History while at Rice. 

Dr. Boles finds the Committee's greatest asset is its 
ability to "bring humanities scholars to the grass roots 
people." He said that it is this interaction of academics 
with average people that is the touchstone of all state- 
based committees. 

Since he has been on the Committee, Dr. Boles said he 
has seen it "grow intellectually." He explained that during 
the last few months Committee members have "started to 
address themselves to the fundamental questions of giving 
out public money," partially in response to the new 
guidelines and partially due to increased experience with 
grants. 

After completing his year at Rice, Dr. Boles will join the 
faculty at Tulane University in Louisiana. Dr. Boles, said 
that he may become involved with the state-based com- 



The Maryland Committee is accepting resumes of those 
interested in positions as Committee members. Scholars, 
public representatives from business, labor and neigh- 
brohood groups with a special interest in the humanities 
are encouraged to submit their qualifications. Duties for 
members include reading proposals, attending meetings and 
conferences, as well as reviewing proposals submitted for 
grants. 

Those interested should forward resumes to the Mem- 
bership Committee, c/o Maryland Committee for the 
Humanities, 330 N. Charles Street, Room 306, Baltimore, 
Md. 21201. 

Project Guidelines Expanded 

Does your group have an idea for a history project? Or 
would you like to examine the way current issues have 
been treated by authors or philosophers? Would you like to 
find out how the humanities relate to public issues? These 
are just some of the possibilities for projects now ap- 
propriate for funding under the new guidelines set by the 
Maryland Committee for the Humanities. 

The Maryland Committee has been awarded $600,000 by 
the National Endowment for the Humanities to regrant 
within the state between now and September 30, 1978. The 
new program latitude approved by NEH will enable groups 
to apply for grants in three areas: 

1) PUBLIC POLICY ISSUES-Projects which deal with 
major public issues. These remain the major thrust and 
purpose of the Committee. 

2) SOCIAL ISSUES-Projects which deal with historical, 
socio-ethical and/or environmental issues. 

3) HUMANITIES SEMINARS-Projects which serve as 
introductory seminars to the humanities. These seminars or 
workshops describe the role of the scholars and why it is 
important to include scholars in public policy discussion. 

The general guidelines for projects remain the same. 
They should involve the general public or a group of 
citizens and scholars and must be sponsored by a non- 
profit group or institution. Projects must not be designed 
to lobby or simply present one side of an issue. 

WRITE US 

The Maryland Committee is providing a service to the 
citizens of Maryland. If you would like to see additional 
program areas added, have suggestions for other programs, 
or would like program materials, guidelines or application 
forms, write: MCH, 330 N. Charles St., Room 306, 
Baltimore, Md. 21201. 



The Newsletter 


for the Maryland Committee foi 


the 


Humanities is 


a bimonthly 


publication. 


For 


extra 


copies or further informatior 


, telephone 


(301) 


837- 


1938 or write 


MCH, 330 N. 


Charles St., 


Room 


306, 


Baltimore, Md. 


21201. 








Editor: Barbara 


Barbiero 









NEH Holds Summer Seminars in Maryland 



College Teachers Discuss Architecture, 
Egypt and Philosophy 

For the past five years, the National Endowment for the 
Humanities has sponsored summer seminars for college 
teachers. These programs, which are intended for faculty in 
undergraduate and two-year colleges, are designed to 
provide participants with the opportunity to work with 
experts in their fields as well us give them a chance to use 
libraries suitable for advanced study. 

Three professors at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore 
are leading the eight week summer seminars; Dr. Egon 
Verheyen on "Architecture of the United States; Dr. Hans 
Coedicke on "Ancient Egypt: An Integrated Humanistic 
Approach"; and Dr. Maurice Mandelbaum on "Philosophy 
and the Social Sciences: A History of Social Theory." One 
hundred and three additional seminars in other parts of the 
country deal with various topics in music, art history, 
English and American literature, film, drama, political 
science, language, linguistics, anthropology and others. 

Dr. Verheyen is participating in the program for the 
second time. He believes that the major benefits of such 
programs are improving the research skills of the par- 
ticipants and making them aware of the different ways 
certain facts can be looked at. "There is a big difference 
between what we know compared to what the fiction is," 
Dr. Verheyen says. "I hope this makes them think about 
what they teach as well. It gives them a chance to analyze 
how they deal with material." 

As were all the seminar organizers, Dr. Verheyen was 
able to choose those attending his seminar. Participants 
were chosen on the basis of their backgrounds and the 
type of project they were interested in doing for the 
program. Dr. Verheyen says he chose people from different 
disciplines who he believed could contribute to the 
seminar. A limited amount of experience in architecture 
was also necessary. 

Dr. Hans Coedicke's seminar looks at ancient Egypt in an 
integrated, humanistic manner. Because the ancient 
Egyptian civilization can be viewed in its entirety, Dr. 
Coedicke finds it an "ideal" example of study, "a 
laboratory case of sorts," which follows a cultural sequence 
from beginning to end. 

The aim of the seminar is to point out the characteristics 
of Egypt as a culture, to study the changes this culture 
went through, and to examine the impact Egypt had on 
other cultures. 

Dr. Henry Chambers, seminar participant who teaches 
ancient history at the University of California in 
Sacramento, finds that what the seminar reinforces and 
what is most difficult to communicate to his students is 
that Egypt, as an ancient society, went through changes. 
"They (students) see ancient Egypt as a constant and don't 
realize that ancient man living over 2,000 years ago did go 
through changes," he says. 

The seminar is different things to different people. Most 
participants agree that it is a rare opportunity to get 
caught up on readings in the field. Dr. Clyde Smith, who 
teaches ancient history at the River Falls branch of the 
University of Wisconsin, was attracted to the program 
because of the library facilities available and because of 
Dr Coedicke. "One of the things I most wanted to do was 
study with someone who knows the readings," he said. Dr 
John Eiklor from the University of Northern Iowa wanted to 



"catch up on current scholarships. I was looking for a 
reappraisal of Egyptology and found it beyond my wildest 
dreams," he said. 

The third seminar addresses philosophy and how political 
theory, the philosophy of history and the general an- 
thropological and social history are influenced by 
philosophical problems. Dr. Maurice Mandelbaum, who is 
conducting the seminar, finds that in "social science there 
is a lot of overlap of the same philosophical problems." 
The seminar, which is a dialogue between social scientists 
and philosophers, is an attempt to examine certain 
philosophical themes that are common to all the social 
sciences. 

Dr. Stephen Sandersen, who teaches sociology at Indiana 
University in Pennsylvania, finds the inclusion in the 
seminar of philosophers and social scientists exciting, yet 
not without its problems. He says there is a "different 
mode of discourse" between the two groups because they 
both tend to "speak their own language." Yet Dr. Colleen 
Stanishkin, who teaches philosophy at Millersville State 
College in Pennsylvania, finds the differences of language 
and subject matter between the two disciplines, not as 
severe or as hard to remedy as she had anticipated. 

Dr. Samuel Hines, a political scientist at the College of 
Charleston in South Carolina, finds the seminar very helpful 
in seeing how "different disciplines treat the same 
problem." He was initially interested in the seminar 
because he had not had much formal training in ! 
philosophy. Yet even while he finds himself "enjoying the ! 
philosophy discussions" he also finds himself asking, "How j 
do I translate this to specific problems?" 




Dr. Kargon leads discussion. 



Public Administrators Discuss 
Science and Society 

Is technology the antithesis of humanism? Has out 
technological society become more or less democratic? Is 
democracy in conflict with expertise? 

Public administrators met at the Johns Hopkins 
University to discuss these and other questions related to 
America in an eight-week seminar sponsored by the 
National Endowment for the Humanities. 

Dr. Robert Kargon, professor of the history of science, 
directed "Democratic Society in a Technical Age. Historical 
Perspectives on the Impact of Science and Technology on 
the American Mind," a seminar dealing with the rapid 
revolution in attitudes that has accompanied America's 
scientific progress in the 20th Century. 

Meeting with state, county and city officials from 
throughout the country, including analysts, planners and 
administrative aides, Dr. Kargon discussed the social, 
economic and technical changes made in America and 

See Administrators, page 6 



10, for the 9-12-year-old 

for the 13- 15-year-old 

for the 16-18-year-old 



What Freedom Means to Them 

Four Baltimore area students won trips for themselves 
and their families to Busch Gardens in Virginia for their 
winning entries in the "What Freedom Means to Me" 
contest sponsored by WCBM radio. 

The Maryland Committee for the Humanities was asked 
to judge the more than 200 entries received. The Com- 
mittee members who served as judges rated the entries on 
originality, style, content and humor. 

Winners were: Bruce Henning, 8, for the 8-year-old and 
under category; Jimmy Robinson, 
category; Renee DeSantis, 15, 
category and Louis Boeri, 17 
category. 

Sheila Butler, promotion director for WCBM, said that 
she asked the Maryland Committee to participate because 
of its experience in dealing with literature and its im- 
partiality. 

WCBM station managers conceived the idea as a 
promotion of Independence Day. Official announcement of 
the winners took place at the Fourth of July celebration at 
Memorial Stadium in Baltimore. 



RENEE DESANTIS-Freedom 
can be narrowed down into 3 
words: Happiness, Oppor- 
tunities, and Choice. But 
most important, freedom 
depends a lot on the word 
"respect." Having respect for 
all enables each of us to 
fulfill our personal goals 
without impeding the goals 
and freedoms of others. 




BRUCE HENNINC-Freedom 
to me is not being wild or 
unprotected by laws. To me 
it means having a right of 
choice and after choosing, 
being able to accept all 
rewards or punishments that 
my choice brings. 





JIM ROBINSON-Freedom is 
a responsibility our ancesters 
left for us. It is a gift of 
love, respect, and something 
to protect. Freedom is a 
word I don't use everyday in 
my vocabulary-but it's part of 
everything I do from going to 
Carney Elementary or playing 
baseball or soccer or fishing 
with my dad, and that is 
what freedom means to me. 



LOUIS BOERI- 

What light is to the eyes: 

What taste is to the tongue: 

What love is to the heart: 

What air is to the lung: 

What sound is to the ear: 

And "part" is to the "whole": 

What day is to the year: 

That's what freedom is to the soul 




Four Roots Projects Planned 

Alex Haley's novel Roots will not soon be forgotten- 
particularly in Maryland where four Roots projects are 
planned. 

Historic Annapolis, Inc., The Community Organization for 
Progress, Inc. with the University of Maryland Eastern 
Shore, the Community College of Baltimore and Coppin 
State College received a total of $15,000 in grants from the 
Maryland Committee for the Humanities for projects that 
will examine different aspects and their significance in Alex 
Haley's work. 

Shortly after the publication of Haley's novel and its 
subsequent television dramatization, the members of the 
Maryland Committee made funds available for proposals to 
deal directly with Roots. Of the ten proposals received, 
four were approved. 

The Annapolis project, "An Historical Analysis of Alex 
Haley's Roots," will use Maryland historians to correlate the 
"reality" of black history in each time period described in 
Kunta Kinte's family. It will attempt to relate the story of 
Kunta Kinte to the stream of black history as it applied to 
Maryland and Maryland blacks throughout the past two 
centuries. 

According to Dr. James Bradford, one of the project 
directors, "the project is intended to provide a greater 
understanding of the whole black experience and a greater 
understanding of Roots" Dr. Bradford said that scholars 
will examine whether or not events in Roots are typical of 
the time periods in which they are depicted and thus use 
the novel as a "tool of understanding" the black ex- 



periences of the time. 

The Community Organization for Progress, with the 
University of Maryland Eastern Shore, will examine "Roots: 
Its Black Maryland Branches." In the four seminars planned 
the social processes involved with religion, education, 
music and the family for citizens of African descent will 
be examined. 

James E. Jolley, the project director, hopes the seminars 
will make the people of Salisbury "more concerned" about 
heritage. "So many people don't know their own roots," he 
said. "I hope this will help them to understand that they 
have something to offer to Salisbury and Maryland." 

A six-month project is planned by the Community 
College of Baltimore. Audio tapes of Roots will be aired 
over WBJC-FM, each to be followed by public forums with 
a panel of community scholars. Workshops will also be 
held for adults in family history. 

Coppin State College plans a forum which will include 
lectures, discussions and individual projects. Dr. Dolores 
Kelly, one of the project directors and a professor at 
Coppin State, hopes that the project will "give the par- 
ticipants a sense of power in terms of tracing their own 
roots, and new attitudes about the difference it makes to 
know ones roots." The program will include examining the 
societal impact of Haley's Roots, learning how to go about 
tracing one's roots, comparing the book version of Roots to 
the television version and examining the effect of the oral 
tradition on the cultural roots of a number of cultural 
units, including the American Indian. 

The four projects will include programs in Annapolis, 
Baltimore, Salisbury, Cambridge, St. Mary's City, Arnold 
and Princess Anne. 



Upcoming People Projects— 



"The Fell Factor." Documentary Theater Company. Carol 
Mason (301) 243-3246. Through dramatization and 
discussion. Documentary Theater Company will explore the 
problems and issues related to the integration of ethnic 
groups into American society. "The Fell Factor," a play 
based on the early history of Fells Point in Baltimore and 
the Fell family will be performed by the Vagabond Players. 
Audience discussion with humanities scholars will follow 
each of the nine performances. 

Spirit Suburban Style. North Area Young Women's Christian 
Association. Ann Krimmel (301) 252-7148. Work has been 
completed on the slide-tape presentation "Roots of 
Diversity, Seeds of Conformity," which deals with the 
history of the Lutherville, Timonium, Cockeysville and 
Upper Baltimore County area. Organizations from this area 
will have the opportunity beginning in September to view 
the slide-tape show and discuss the public policy issues 
behind it. Discussions with community leaders and 
humanities scholars will include issues of land-use, housing, 
preservation of historic sites and urban planning. 
Organizations interested in viewing the presentation should 
contact Ms. Krimmel. 

Children's Literature Series. United Communities Against 
Poverty. Elva Smith (301) 894-6680. For the young, 
literature is not only an agent for learning to read and 
write, it is an avenue to the world beyond. This series, by 
approaching parents, teachers and librarians, is an attempt 
to direct adults to the best way to foster good reading 
habits and a love for books in children and young adults. 
A "Books Are For People Fair" with publisher and library 
displays, local storytellers, local book talkers (storytellers 
for children 13 and older), and a representative from RIF 
(Reading is Fundamental) is planned for the third weekend 
in September Families are encouraged to attend the fair 
anytime between 1 and 5 p.m. 

A History of Remington-A Midtown Community in 
Baltimore. Remington Improvement Association. Mae 

Mortimer (301) 243-7387. The Remington Association has 
been collecting artifacts, pictures and other memorabilia 
pertaining to the midtown area of Baltimore known as 
Remington. An open forum is planned which will include a 
slide presentation of places and people of interest in 
Remington, photographs from the past, old maps and other 
documents. The public is encouraged to attend to help 
identify pictures, to recount when and why their families 
moved to Remington and to share in the discussion of 
Remington's past. Jacques Kelly, historian, and Dr. Randall 
Beirne, geographer, will speak at this forum. 

Exploring New Alternatives for Improving the Urban 
Environment. Neighborhood Development Corporation. 
Sheila P. Thompson (301) 366-1717. This series of four 
workshops will continue to examine how well government 
agencies are meeting human needs as they relate to 
transportation recreation, education, housing and social 
systems. Focus will continue to be on the approaches used 
by public and private institutions for improving the urban 
environment. "Citizen Involvement in Public Transportation 
Planning," the second workshop, will involve discussion of 
transportation systems. 



Life as a Quality Experience. Mayor's Advisory Committee 
on Art and Culture. Barbara Parker (301) 396-4588. In this 
nine-month lunchtime lecture series, the Mayor's Committee 
will explore the past, present and future of life styles and 
value systems that affect the quality of life. This series 
hopes to examine issues which are relevant to current 
social and political concerns on a humanistic level. It is 
hoped that viable alternatives and keener insights into how 
people live individually and as a community will be 
presented. In the first program Barbara Hoff, executive 
director for the committee for architectural preservation, 
will speak on "Experiencing Architecture: Conservation of 
Existing Resources." 

Roots. Coppin State College. Dr. Delores Kelly and Dr. 
Cynthia Morton (301) 383-5908. This ten-part series will 
have a number of objectives, including examining the 
cultural and societal impact of Alex Haley's Roots, 
discussing personal and group identity in terms of self 
esteem, discussing the impact of the oral tradition on the 
cultural roots of various ethnic Americans, and explaining 
how one's roots are traced through genealogical data and 
how this data is collected. The forums will be held once a 
week on alternate Wednesdays and Fridays. 

Roots: Its Black Maryland Branches. Community 
Organization for Progress, Inc. and University of Maryland 
Eastern Shore. James Jolley (301) 742-7847. The social and 
cultural institutions of religion, education, music and family 
addressed in Alex Haley's Roots will be the subject of four 
upcoming seminars. Aimed at providing these institutions 
with the new sense of history, the seminars will include 
speakers, films and discussions. Dr. Samuel Proctor will 
speak at the first program "Religion. Roots and Branches." 

An Historical Analysis of Alex Haley's Roots. Historic 
Annapolis, Inc. Dr. James Bradford, Dr. William Calderhead 
(301) 267-3201. Despite the universal appeal of Alex Haley's 
Roots, many American historians have strongly criticized its 
factual authenticity and have thus created a credibility gap 
in the minds of the American public. In an attempt to 
clear up this gap, a series of symposiums is scheduled for 
the fall and winter months. Maryland historians will discuss 
the major time periods found in Roots to correlate the 
"reality" of black history to the events described by Kunta 
Kinte. The story of Kunta Kinte will be related to the 
stream of black history as it applied to Maryland blacks 
through the last two centuries. The first two programs will 
occur in September. Dr. Philip Curtin, professor of history 
at Johns Hopkins University, will speak on "Africa and the 
Atlantic Slave Trade." Dr. James Bradford, professor of 
history at the U.S. Naval Academy, will speak on 
"Acculturation and the Colonial Slave System." 

O'ty, from page 1 

set by judges cause certain people to receive severe 
sentences, while others may receive light sentences for the 
same crimes. Once a person leaves prison, he said, there is 
little supervision by probation and parole caseworkers 
because of their tremendous work load. What results is 
little hope for rehabilitation. First-time offenders usually 
become second-, third- and fourth-time offenders, he said. 

The solution lies with all citizens working to improve the 
criminal justice system from all agencies and individuals 
involved. "We don't have the commitment as a society 
that is necessary to ensure improvement," he said. 

Discussion of these and other topics involved panelists 
and the audience. The comment of one participant sum- 
marized the feelings of many others, "It's over so soon and 
we just got started." 



Title 

"The Fell Factor" 

Roots 



Citizen Involvement in 
Public Transportation 
Planning 



Calendar of Events - August-September 

Sponsor 

Documentarv Theater Company 
Vagabond Players Theater 
808 S. Broadway 
Baltimore, Maryland 

Coppin State College 
Baltimore. Maryland 



Neighborhood Development Corp. 
University of Baltimore 
Auditorium 
Baltimore, Maryland 



Date 

Friday, Aug. 5, 12, 19 
Saturday, Aug. 6, 13, 20 
Sunday, Aug. 7, 14, 21 



Wednesday, Sept. 7 
7-9 p.m. 

Saturday, Sept. 17 
9 a.m. -12 p.m. 
Wednesday, Sept. 21 
7-9 p.m. 

Thursday, Sept. 8 
9 a.m.-1 p.m. 



Africa and the Atlantic 
Slave Trade 


Historic Annapolis, Inc. 

Anne Arundel Community 

College 

Arnold, Maryland 


Thursday, Sept- 15 
7:30 p.m. 


Books Are for People Fair 


United Communities 
Against Poverty 
Glenarden Town Hall 
Glenarden, Maryland 


Sunday, Sept. 18 
1-5 p.m. 


Religion: Roots and Branches 


Community Organization for 

Progress, Inc. 

Wesley Temple Church 

West Street 

Salisbury, Maryland 


Thursday, Sept. 22 
8 p.m. 


Experiencing Architecture: 
Conservation of Existing 
Resources 


Mayor's Advisory Committee 
on Art and Culture 
Fiscal Meeting Room 
City Hall 
Baltimore, Maryland 


Tuesday, Sept. 27 
Wednesday, Sept. 28 
Thursday, Sept. 29 
12-1 p.m. 


A History of Remington- 
A Midtown Community of 
Baltimore 


Remington Improvement Association 
Church of the Guardian Angel 
33 S. W. 27th Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 


Wednesday, Sept. 28 
7:30 p.m. 


Acculturation and the 
Colonial Slave System 


Historic Annapolis, Inc. 

St. Mary's College 

St. Mary's City, Maryland 


Thursday, Sept. 29 
7:30 p.m. 



Administrators, from page 3 

other technologically advanced societies and the im- 
plications these changes suggest. 

"My aim," Dr. Kargon said, "was to take history and 
reassess our assumptions, to show how the idea 'expertise' 
came about." Dr. Kargon said that people tend to believe 
what happens is inevitable and to think that expertise is 
inevitable. By looking at history they can see it isn't so. 
"History shows us that we are not natural andinevitable.lt 
confronts us with ourselves," he said. 

The seminar was largely an effort to allow public ad- 
ministrators time to stand back, away from budgets and 
politics, and examine the historical, philosophical and 



social dimensions of their profession. 

Aubrey Howard, executive director of the Beale Street 
National Historic Foundation in Memphis, found that he 
was able to do just that. "It gave us the opportunity to 
philosophize about what we presently do and what our 
futures will be," he said. 

Gerald Pannick, aide to Maryland's speaker of the house 
of delegates, found it a rare opportunity to discuss the 
"philosophical, economic and cultural background of the 
administrative process." 

For Dr. Kargon working with the administrators was "a 
pleasant surprise. They were one of the best groups I've 
ever dealt with," he said. 



The Maryland Committee for the Humanities 
330 North Charles St., Rm. 306 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



Dr. Robert A. Corrigan, Chairman 

Mr. Herbert B. Cahan, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. P. William Filby, Fiscal Officer 

Mr. George E. Allen 

Mrs. Margaret D. Armstrong 

Ms. Mary Combs Barber 

Dr. John B. Boles 

Dr. Frederick Breitenfeld, Jr. 

Mr. Edwin Castagna 

Dr. Thomas R. Cripps 

Mrs. Raymond Palmer Delano, Jr. 

Mr. David C. Driskell 

Mrs. Mae E. Dyson 

Mr. John M. Klaus 

Mr. B. Nathaniel Knight 

Dr. Maurice Mandelbaum 

Dr. Samuel L. Myers 

Dr. Melvin D. Palmer 

Mr. H. Michael Ryan, Jr. 

Dr. Carolyn Reid Wallace 

Dr. William H. Wroten, Jr. 

Maria Heyssel, Executive Director 

Patricia L. Hunt, Assistant Director 



l, r . llowaj^velstad 



Libra 



NON-Profit 


Org. 


U.S. Postage 


PAID 




Baltimore, 


Md. 


Permit No. 


6371 



*oll e^e 



ivorsity of i ' | d« 
Park, Mi. 20740 



humanities & 
public policy 



PEOPLE PROJECTS 



Calendar of Events - OCTOBER 1977 



Conference on Baltimore History 

Di rector 
Randall Beirne (301) 727-6350 






s\ 



Maryland Historical Society 
University of Baltimore 
Langsdale Library 
Baltimore, Maryland 



Saturday, Oct. 1 
9 a.m. - 3^30 p.m. 



A day-long workshop is planned with scholars, presentations, cpm^unity leaders, teachers, etc. 

to discuss ethnic and oral history. 

Ethics for a Small Planet : 

The Future as Present Choice 



Dr. Fontaine Bel ford (301) 825-3300 
The Present's Future 



Living Our Limits 
Choosing a Future 



Goucher Col lege 
College Center Lect 
Towson , Maryland 

Same as above 

Same as above 




turday, Oct. 1 
9:30 a.m. - ^:00 p.m. 



Oct. 8 - 9=30 a.m. 
Oct. 15 "9:30 a.m. 



This series is intended to stimulate constructive preparation for the future and will include 
a morning session with major addresses and an afternoon session of workshops. Pre-registrat ion 
is required. Note: a $10 fee includes three lunches. 



Roots 



Dr. Delores Kelly (301) 383"5908 



Coppin State College 
Office Classroom Building 
Room 120 
Baltimore, Maryland 



Saturday, Oct. 1 ,15,29 
9 a.m. - 12 noon 
Wednesday, Oct. 5, 19 
7:00 - 9:00 p.m. 



This project examines the cultural and societal impact of Alex Halley's Roots and will involve 
discussing the impact of the oral tradition on the cultural roots of various ethnic Americans. 



Crime and People: Is There 
a Solution? 

Dr. Ernest Kahn (301) 528-5100 



U. of Md. School of Social 
Work and Community Planning 
and Southeast Community 
Organizat ion 
Location to be announced 



Monday, Oct. 3 
8 p.m. 



Dr. Pieter Lejins, professor of criminology at College Park, will keynote this program on 
crime, the problem it presents and possible solutions. 



<A 



Controversies in Taste Walters Art Gallery October 3,10,17,24,31 

600 N. Charles Street 8 p.m. 

Theodore Low (301) 5^7-9000 Baltimore, Maryland 

This series will be an ongoing discussion of historical controversies in taste and thought 
in art presented by local curators and visiting art scholars. 

Humanities and the People 

Kenneth Stein (301) 396-0^04 

Urban Storytelling: Tales and WBJC 91. 5 FM Wednesday, Oct. 5 

Stories as Bearers of Tradition 7 p . m . 

Baltimore: Inspiration for Artists WBJC 91.5 FM October 12 - 7 p.m. 

Street Music WBJC 91-5 FM October 19 - 7 p.m. 

New Politicians: How College WBJC 91-5 FM October 26 - 7 p.m. 

Students View Politics as a Career 

This is a weekly series of discussion programs dealing with the humanities and how they relate 
to human experience. 

Children's Literature Series United Communities 

Against Poverty 
Elva Smith (301) 894-6680 

Children and Books Call for Location Sunday, Oct. 9 

5:30 - 7:30 p.m. 

Literature for Pre-School Call for Location Saturday, Oct. 15 

Childred 2:30 - 5 p.m. 

Literature for New Readers, Call for Location Saturday, Oct. 29 

Older Children and Young Adults 2:30 - 5 p.m. 

This series is an attempt to direct adults to the best way to foster good reading habits and 
a love for books in children and young adults. 

What is Quality Education ? Neighborhood Development Corp. Wednesday, Oct. 12 

Pimlico Multi Purpose Center 8 p.m. 
Sheila Thompson (301) 366-1717 3319 West Belvedere Avenue 

This program will examine how well government agencies are meeting human needs as they relate 
to quality education. 

The Right to Die: The Bio- Baltimore Hebrew College Wednesday, Oct. 12 

Ethical Frontier 5800 Park Heights Avenue 8 p.m. 

Baltimore, Maryland 
Dr. Ernest Kahn (301) 528-5100 

Levering Hall Thursday, Oct. 13 

Johns Hopkins University 9 a.m. - 5 p.m- 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Dr. Robert Veatch and Dr. Hans Jonas will speak during this two-day session on the individual, 
professional, societal, legal and religious consequences of the right to die. 



A Historical Analysis of Alex Historic Annapolis, Inc. 

Haley's Roots 

Dr. James Bradford (301) 267~31 36 

The Evils of the Slave System Coppin State College Thursday, Oct. 13 

Baltimore, Maryland 7:30 p.m. 

A Cure to Slavery Short of Talbot County High School Thursday, Oct. 27 

Civil War? Easton, Maryland 7:30 p.m. 

Dr. Betty Jo Gardiner of Coppin State College and Dr. William Calderhead of the U.S. Naval 
Academy will speak at the October symposiums which attempt to correlate the reality of black 
history to the events in Roots. 

Baltimore's Dance Heritage Mayor's Advisory Committee October 18, 20, 21 

on Art and Culture 12 - 1 p.m. 

Barbara Parker (301) 396-4588 Mechanic Theater N. Lounge 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Crystelle T. Bond will speak on dance in Thursdays continuing series of lunchtime lectures 
called "Life as a Quality Experience." 

Power and Public Policy: Women's Hood College Wednesday, Oct. 26 

Role in Change Frederick, Maryland 4-6 p.m., 8-10 p.m. 

Ruth M. Oltman (301) 663~31 3 1 Thursday, Oct. 27 

4-6 p.m. , 8-1 p.m. 

Seminars and workshops will deal with the historical origins of women's role in society and 
the strategies necessary for changing them. Note: To attend dinner on both evenings, pre- 
registration is required. 

Education: Roots and Branches Community Organization Thursday, Oct. 27 

for Progress, Inc. and 8 p.m. 

James Jolley (301) 7^2-7847 U. of Md., Eastern Shore 

Ella Fitzgerald Center 

Edward Henry (301) 742-7335 for the Performing Arts 

Princess Anne, Maryland 

Dr. Allan Ballard of the Moton Center for Advanced Studies will speak on education as seen in 
Roots and its historical significance. 

Town Meetings on the Pursuit Offender Aid and October 28, 29 

of Justice Restoration November 1, 2 

Weekdays 7:30 - 9:30 p.m. 
David Eberhardt (301) 332-0777 Call for Location Saturday 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Criminal justice experts, judges and community leaders will discuss the alternatives to 
incarcerat ion. 



The Maryland Committee for the Humanities and Public Policy 
330 North Charles St., Rm. 306 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



Dr Robert A. Corngan, Chairman 

Mr. Herbert B. Cahan, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. P. William Filby. Fiscal Officer 

Mr. George E Allen 

Mrs Margaret D. Armstrong 

Ms. Mary Combs Barber 

Dr. John B. Boles 

Dr. Frederick Breitenfeld. Jr. 

Mr Edwin Castagna 

Dr Thomas R. Cripps 

Mrs. Raymond Palmer Delano, Jr 

Mr. David C. Driskell 

Mrs Mae E. Dyson 

Mr. John M. Klaus 

Mr. B. Nathaniel Knight 

Dr. Maurice Mandelbaum 

Dr. Samuel I. Myers 

Dr. Melvin D. Palmer 

Mr. H. Michael Ryan, Jr. 

Dr. Carolyn Reid Wallace 

Dr. WHIiam H. Wroten, Jr. 

Maria Heyssel, Executive Director 

Patricia L. Hunt. Assistant Director 



NON-Profif 


Org. 


U.S. Postage 


PAID 




Baltimore, 


Md. 


Permit No. 


6371 



hr . Howard Hovolstad 
Libraries ,,,, 

The University ol «• 




humanities & 
public policy 



PEOPLE PROJECTS 



MARYLAND 

-i — »*- 



-vrr 



Volume 2, No. 3 Nov/Dec. 1977 



Documentary Theater utu 23 1977 
Comes to Fells Point' 



D r PT. 



Between the years 1723 and 1800, Fells 
Point was known as the "window to the 
world." With its natural deep harbor and 
the rapid development of its community 
after the initial purchase of 100 acres by 
William Fell, what was named Fells 
Prospect and called Fells Point, grew into a 
bustling harbor town and the center of 
Maryland's shipping trade. 

The Maryland Documentary Theatre of 
Fells Point recreated the local history of 
the area, which is now part of Baltimore 
city, in "The Fell Factor," a play resear- 
ched and developed by the company, 
produced and directed by Carol Mason, 
and funded by the Maryland Committee 
for the Humanities. 

Through a series of vignettes which 
flashed back to colonial Fells Point, a 
picture of how the Fell family acquired 
and developed the area was presented in 
this August production. 

Called Fells Point because of its hooked 



land mass that jutted out into the harbor, 
it was from here that Maryland's tobacco, 
wheat and corn were shipped. The sleek 
10-man schooners which sailed from Fells 
Point were noted for their ability to out 
maneuver and outrun the British patrols. 
As a result, smuggling was a viable ad- 
dition or alternative to the legal shipping 
trade of the area. 

Chuck Bollinger, Joanne Bouton, Kitty 
Dinges and Victor Rebovitch portrayed the 
original Fell family, their relatives, and 
people of the area that were directly and 
indirectly affected by them. The 
characters ranged from William Fell, who 
arrived in Maryland in 1746 and purchased 
what was then called Corpus Harbor, to an 
English seamstress, a German clockmaker, 
an Irish indentured Servant, to William 
Fell II, who died in 1786, the last member 
of the Fell family. 

The cast of four not only played the 
twelve characters, but they became their 




Chuck Bollinger, Victor Rebovitch, Joanne Bouton and Kitty Dinges perform in "The Fell 
Factor." 




...improvising a hope chest 

own props as well. A human clock, with an 
arm as pendulum, a chest of drawers 
mimed by two crouching figures and a 
desk complete with quill pen were a few of 
the imaginative particulars of the play. 

Carol Mason's first attempt at 
documentary theater in Baltimore was "In 
the Nook of Time." Also funded by the 
Maryland Committee for the Humanities, 
it centered on the historical artifacts found 
in an excavation of a Fells Point Tavern. 

Ms. Mason brought the notion of 
documentary drama with her when she 
came to Maryland from her native England 
in 1972. 

"One of the major ingredients of this 
kind of theater," she said, "is the company 
as a whole researches and develops the 
material. You take what stimulates you 
from local history and present it by guiding 
and cooperating with the creativity of the 
actors." 

More than 400 people attended "The 
Fell Factor," which ran for three weekends 
in August. "I think we succeeded in in- 
teresting people in neighborhood history," 
Ms. Mason said. "And everybody seemed 
to love it." 



«K 



Newsletter of the Maryland Committee for the! Humanities 




Dr. Marianne Alexander 



Committee Notes- 



While Maria Heyssel, executive director of the Maryland 
Committee for the Humanities.is on a three-month sabbatical, a 
scholar has been invited to work with the staff in an evaluative 
and administrative function. 

Dr. Marianne Alexander, an assistant professor at University 
College of the University of Maryland, is adding her expertise in 
the humanities and public policy to the workings of the Com- 
mittee. 

Specifically, Dr. Alexander is developing a list of available 
scholars within the state to act as consultants and to aid in 
writing proposals. She is also evaluating the role of the scholar in 
state humanities programs and reviewing projects. 

Dr. Alexander brings with her much experience in public 
policy. She has been a legislative aide to the state finance 
committee in charge of interns and has served on the research 
staffs of the Maryland constitutional convention and the 
governor's commission on executive reorganization. 

More recently she worked for the Women's Caucus, a group 
consisting of the 21 women state legislators, as an aide super- 
vising student interns and writing proposals. She also par- 
ticipated in the Morgan State project, "Women and the Struggle 
for Democracy." 

Dr. Alexander received her master's and doctoral degrees in 
American studies. She is a contributing author to two volumes 
on women in Maryland history. The first, Notable Maryland 
Women, was published in 1977. The second will be published 
next year. 

Dr. Alexander has been adjusting easily to her new duties. 
"I've been involved for a long time in applied humanities," she 
said. "I feel very comfortable here." 

The staff and committee would like to thank the retiring 
members, Herbert B. Cahan, P. William Filby, Mary Combs 
Barber, Dr. )ohn B. Boles, Edwin Castagna, Dr. Maurice Man- 
delbaum, Dr. Samuel L. Myers, Nathaniel Knight and Audrey 
Delano for their service and dedication. 

Several new members from a variety of areas in the humanities 
have joined the Committee this fall: 

• Dr. Fontaine Belford is director of the Coucher Center for 
Educational Resources She received her Ph.D. in comparative 
literature and her master's degree in philosophical theology and 
ethics. She has taught French, English and comparative 
literature Dr. Belford has written numerous articles and is 
presently working on a book entitled £th/cs and the Literary 
Imagination. She is project director for Coucher's "Ethics for a 
Small Planet." 



•Dr. Andrew Billingsley is the president of Morgan State 
University and a professor of sociology. He received an M.S. 
from Boston University and the University and his PhD from 
Brandeis University. He is the author of Black Families in White 
America. 

• Dr. Eugene Brody is a professor of psychiatry and human 
behavior at the University of Maryland and director of "Program 
of Humanistic Studies in Medicine" at the University. He has 
authored and edited numerous books, pamphlets and articles in 
his field including the American Handbook of Psychiatry. Dr. 
Brody is a member of numerous national and international 
psychiatric, mental health and community organizations. 

• Dr. Joseph W. Cox is the vice president for academic affairs 
and dean of the College for English, History and the Social 
Sciences at Towson State University. He has been involved in 
reevaluating and reorganizing degree programs and in a faculty 
development program. A former history professor, Dr. Cox has 
authored two books and numerous articles and is currently doing 
research for a book on the Maryland Historical Society. 

• Dr. Ruth Oltman is coordinator for the Women's Center at 
Hood College. She was dean of the graduate program at Hood 
and has had experience counseling and teaching. Dr. Oltman 
who received her Ph.D. in psychology (counciling) is the project 
director for Hood's "Power and Public Policy: Women's Role in 
Change." 

• Dr. Gerald Pannick is the administrative assistant to the 
speaker of the House of Delegates in Maryland. Dr. Pannick 
received his Ph.D. in literature and has other degrees in music, 
history and philosophy. He taught at St. Mary's College and has 
been active in projects of the St. Mary's Creative Arts Forum. 

• Mr. George Piendak is the chief of the bureau of budget and 
management research for the department of finance. He has 
received his M. A. in comparative politics and administration and 
his MBA. Formerly a fiscal policy analyst for the Baltimore City 
Council, Mr. Piendak has also been a member of the board of 
directors of the Citizens Planning and Housing Association, 
Baltimore Arts Festival and Baltimore Children's Theatre, and has 
held various college teaching positions. 

• Mr. Garnie Poison is a senior agricultural extension agent for 
the Maryland Cooperative Extension Service. He has an M.A. in 
animal husbandry and a background in teaching. Mr. Poison is a 
member of many civic and community organizations, including 
the Community Development Society and the Community 
Organization for Progress. He was instrumental in writing and 
implementing the People Project, "Citizen Education for Rural 
Development: A Team Approach on Issues and Problems of 
Unemployment." 

• John D. Roth is mayor of Takoma Park, Maryland. He is vice- 
president of the Maryland Municipal League and a member of 
the board of directors of Washington Metropolitan Council of 
Government. He held various policy and management positions 
in his 33 year career with the U.S. Civil Service Commission. 

• Dr. A JR. Russell-Wood is a professor of history at Johns 
Hopkins University. He received all of his degrees at the 
University of Oxford. Dr. Russell-Wood has also taught Por- 
tuguese and literature. He is a consultant to U.N.E.S.C.O., 

See Notes, page 6 



The Newsletter for the Maryland Committee for the 
Humanities is a bimonthly publication. For extra copies or 
further information, telephone (301) 837-1938 or write MCH, 
330 N. Charles St., Room 306, Baltimore, Md. 21201. 

Editor: Barbara Barbiero 



Calendar of Events - November-December 



Title 

Career Husbands and Wives 

Humanities and the People 



Roots and the Media: Using 
Roots in the Classroom 



Criminal Justice and the Community 



Children and Books 



Crime and People: Is There 
a Solution? 

A Cure to Slavery Short of 
Civil War? 



Science and Morals 



Using Literature with Young 
Children 



Literature for Older Children and 
Young Adults 

Black Theatre 



Women and Power: Dimension 
of Women's Historical Experience 

Myth and Folklore: 
Africa to the U.S. 



Music: Roots and Branches 



Public Regulation or Self 
Regulation: The Future 
of Private Enterprise 

Blacks and the Civil War 



Sponsor 

Baltimore New Directions for Women 
College of Notre Dame, Fourier Hall 
Baltimore, Maryland 

WBJC91.5FM 



Coppin State College 

Office Classroom Building, Room 120 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Offender Aid and Restoration 
Woods Memorial Church 
1 1 1 Baltimore and Annapolis Blvd . 
Severna Park, Maryland 

United Communities Against Poverty 
Glenarden Community Center 
Glenarden, Maryland 

U. of Maryland School of Social Work 
Call for Location 

Banneker-Douglass Museum Foundation 
Talbot County High School 
Easton, Maryland 

North Bethesda United Methodist Church 
10100 Old Georgetown Road 
Bethesda, Maryland 

United Communities Against Poverty 
Glenarden Community Center 
Glenarden, Maryland 

Same as Above 



Mayor's Advisory Comm. on Art and Culture 
Arena Players, Inc., 801 McCulloh Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 

University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 

Community College of Baltimore 
The Forum, Harbor Campus 
Baltimore, Maryland 

Community Organization for Progress, Inc. 
Cambridge-South Dorchester High School 
Cambridge Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University Center for Metropolitan 
Enterprise and Baltimore Chamber of Commerce 
Lord Baltimore Hotel, Baltimore Maryland 

Banneker-Douglass Museum Foundation 
Anne Arundel Community College 
Arnold, Maryland 



Date 

Tuesday, Nov. 1 
Tuesday, Nov. 8 
8-10p.m. 

Every Wednesday, 8 p.m. 
Nov. 2-Nov. 30 

Wednesday, Nov. 2 
7-9 p.m. 



Nov. 4, 7, 8 
7:30-9:30 p.m. 
Nov. 5 
12-4:30p.m. 

Saturday, Nov. 5 
5:30-7:30 p.m. 



Monday, Nov. 7 
8p.m. 

Tuesday, Nov. 8 
7:15p.m. 



Thursday, Nov. 10 
8p.m. 



Saturday, Nov. 12 
2:30-4:30 p.m. 



Saturday, Nov. 26 
2:30-4:30 p.m. 

Nov. 15, 16, 17 
12-1 p.m. 



Wednesday, Nov. 16-18 
All Day 

Wednesday, Nov. 16 
2:00p.m. 



Wednesday, Nov. 16 
8p.m. 



Friday, Nov. 18 
9a.m. -4 p.m. 



Saturday, Nov. 19 
7:30p.m. 



Black Women and the Family 


Community College of Baltimore 
Nursing Auditorium, Liberty Campus 
Baltimore, Maryland 


Wednesday, Dec. 1 
2:00p.m. 


Humanities and the People 


WBJC91.5F.M. 


Every Wednesday, 8 p.m. 
Dec. 7-Dec.21 


The Family: Roots and Branches 


Community Organization for Progress, Inc. 
Ella Fitzgerald Center, U. of Md. Eastern Shore 
Princess Anne, Maryland 


Thursday, Dec. 8 
8p.m. 


Books Are for People Fair 


United Community Against Poverty 
Call for time and location 


Saturday, Dec. 10 


A Dream Betrayed 


Banneker-Douglass Museum Foundation 
University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 


Tuesday, Dec. 13 
7:30p.m. 


Art as a Human Service 


Mayor's Advisory Comm. on Art and Culture 
Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 


Dec. 20, 21,22 
12-1 p.m. 




Robert Heilbroner keynotes "Ethics for a Small Planet: The 
Future as Present Choice." 

Heilbroner Warns of the Future 

The earth can double one more time safely, after which 
lifestyles based on expansion will have to stop and attitudes 
regarding individualism, acquisition and "conquering nature" 
will have to change. This change, according to Robert 
Heilbroner, will occur either voluntarily or by force. 

Keynoting the opening session of "Ethics for a Small Planet: 
The Future as Present Choice," Dr. Heilbroner, professor of 
economics at the New School of Social Research and author of 
An Inquiry into the Human Prospect, discussed this planet's past, 
present and future. 

"There is something very impressive in running an hour 
newsreel of human history. In the first 50 minutes there would be 
the absence of a plot, but in the last ten minutes, all hell would 
break loose," he said. 

The crucial changes in the film marked by the emergence of 
three ideas, Dr. Heilbroner said; the notion that the basic unit of 
society is not the group, but the individual; that the people's 



primary economic aim is not preservation or reproduction, but 
acquisition; and the view that man is not a partner to nature, but 
nature's conqueror. 

Speaking at this Coucher People Project, funded by the 
Maryland Committee for the Humanities, Dr. Heilbroner said 
that present trends are warning humankind that the earth is 
beginning to approach boundaries in terms of population, 
pollution and resources and that there must be some kind of 
accommodation. 

"The earth has one more safe doubling," he said. "For us in the 
West that means 25 years of growth and one more generation to 
think." 

Dr. Heilbroner said there must be a radical reorganization of 
ideas which will come either through education or under duress. 
"The chances of change by duress are much greater," he said. 
The danger in this, he said, is that "it may lead to change in the 
direction we don't like-to the rise of authoritarian govern- 
ments." 

"My purpose is to advise you that there could be something 
worse, in hopes that that will raise you to a level of seriousness," 
he said. 

Dr. Heilbroner spoke at the opening session, "The Present's 
Future" Dennis Pirages, Director of the Program on Technology, 
Resources and Sustained Growth at the University of Maryland 
and Hazel Henderson, co-director of the Princeton Center for 
Alternative Futures spoke at the two following Saturday sessions. 
Afternoon workshops and discussions involved more than 200 
participants. 

Suburban Slide/ 

Tape Program Available 

Spirit, Suburban Style, a slide show funded by the Maryland 
Committee for the Humanities, is available for religious, 
educational or social organizations which meet in the Towson to 
Cockeysville area. This free presentation includes a slide-tape 
presentation, "Roots of Diversity, Seeds of Conformity," and a 
panel composed of a humanities scholar from a local college and 
a community leader. A member from the organization 
requesting the program is part of the panel as well. 

Program topics may vary from subjects on housing needs for 
the elderly, effects of rapid growth on the suburbs or the role of 
the sponsoring organization in the community. 

This program may be requested by calling the North Area 
YWCA at (301) 252-4230. 



Clip and Mail to: 

The Maryland Committee for the Humanities 

330 North Charles St., Rm. 306 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

PLEASE SEND: 

□ Grant application package. 

PLEASE NOTE: 

□ I may be interested in taking part in planning a project. 

D My organization may be interested in sponsoring a project. 

□ As a Humanities scholar, I am interested in discussing public 
policy issues with an adult audience. 



NAME 
ADDRESS 



Name of Organization: 



Upcoming People Projects- 



An Historical Analysis of Alex Haley's "Roots." Banneker- 
Douglass Museum Foundation. Dr. James Bradford, Dr. William 
Calderhead (301) 267-3201. In this symposium, Maryland 
historians are examining the major time periods found in Roots 
to correlate the "reality" of black history to the events described 
by Kunta Kinta The two programs in November will feature 
William L Calderhead of the U.S. Naval Academy, who will 
speak on "A Cure to Slavery Short of Civil War?" and Robert Bell 
of Bunker Hill College in Boston, who will speak on "Blacks and 
the Civil War." Betty Thomas of the University of Maryland will 
speak in December on "A Dream Betrayed." 

Town Meetings on the Pursuit of Justice Offender Aid and 
Restoration. Inez Stripling (301) 224-1239. This second series of 
town meetings will consider those American traditions that need 
to be emphasized in the search for solutions to criminal justice 
problems and will provide an opportunity for public response to 
present deliberations and to proposed courses of action. The 
November series will include programs on "Criminal Justice and 
the Community" and "Building the Bridge Between the Criminal 
Justice System and the Community." There will be panelists and 
open discussions. 

Career Husbands and their Wives: Their Changing Roles and the 
Impact on the Modern Family. Baltimore New Directions for 
Women. Helen Stough (301) 566-6194. The issues related to 
modern family life and how it is affected by social change of 
today's society will be discussed in this project. It hopes to 
create an opportunity for married couples and others who are 
interested in exploring ideas and alternative points of view 
relating to dual careers in the family, to examine their roles 
through group discussions, peer role models, individual exercises 
and the employment of the expertise and disciplines of selected 
humanists. 

Moral Choices in Contemporary Society. North Bethesda United 
Methodist Church. Donald Rodgers (301) 299-6449. "Science and 
Morals" will be the November topic of discussion in this six-part 
series on moral choices. The programs, which are coordinated 
with the weekly article series appearing in the Washington Post, 
are open to the public. Dr. Edward Benz, genetic research 
scientist at the National Institute of Health, and a representative 
of the Kennedy Center for Bioethics will participate in this 
program. 

Life as a Quality Experience. Mayor's Advisory Committee on Art 
and Culture. Barbara Parker (301) 396-4588. This lunchtime 
lecture series continues to explore values and life styles that 
affect the quality of life by examining the issues that are relevant 
to current social and political concerns on a humanistic level. 
Alfredin Parham Brown, associate director of the Urban Services 
Cultural Arts Project, will speak on "Black Theatre" in 
November. Philip Arnoult, director and founder of the Baltimore 
Theatre Project will speak on "Art as a Human Experience" in 
December. 

International Conference in Women's History. University of 
Maryland. Dr. Hilda Smith (301) 454-2843. This program will be 
an intensive three-day "series of addresses, discussions and 
workshops on the manner in which women exercise power. 
Although the bulk of the conference will be devoted to European 
women, there will be a number of panels and workshops which 
include comparative materials from the Third World and the 
United States. The conference schedule is established under four 
major categories: Ideology and Methodology, Economic 
Dimension, Sexual and Domestic Dimensions and Public 



Dimension Registration fee for the three days is $25 Daily 
registration is $8, which will include lunch. People are invited to 
attend individual sessions which require no registration fee. 

Humanities and the People. WBjC-FM. Kenneth Stein (301) 396- 
0404 WBJC is broadcasting a weekly series of panel-discussion 
audience-participation programs dealing with the humanities 
and how they relate to human experience. Members of the 
audience can participate in the on-air program by telephoning 
comments and questions to the station. November programs- 
include: Nov. 2, Realism vs. Abstract: How Artists View the 
World; Nov. 9, Sampler of Baltimore Folk Culture; Nov. 16, At 
the Zoo Communication with Animals; Nov. 23, Materialism as 
Expression; Nov. 30, Conversations as Expression. December 
programs include: Dec. 7, Museum's Role in the Art of 
Baltimore; Dec. 14, The Evangelical Experience; Dec. 21, Dance 
and Body Movement as Expression. 

Roots Forum. Coppin State College. Dr. Delores Kelly and Dr 
Cynthia Mortion (301) 383-5908. This series, which has examined 
the cultural and societal impact of Alex Haley's Roots and the 
impact of the oral tradition on American's cultural roots, will 
examine "Roots and the Media: Using Roots in the Classroom" in 
its November program. 

Roots: Its Black Maryland Branches. The Community 
Organization for Progress, Inc. and University of Maryland 
Eastern Shore. James E. Jolley (301) 742-7847. Music and the 
family, the final two topics of discussion in this project, which is 
examining these and other social and cultural institutions in Alex 
Haley's Roots, will be presented in November and December. 
The University of Maryland Gospel Choir will participate in 
"Music: Roots and Branches," which will examine the West 
African roots of African-American music. Rev. Leon Sullivan, 
founder of the Opportunities Industrial Centers, will participate 
in "The Family: Roots and Branches," which will examine the 
role of the Black family in America. 

See Projects, page 6 




Dr. Delores Kelly, project director of the Coppin State College 
Roots project, introduces Dr. Sidney Krome, who discussed the 
Jewish oral tradition, and Dr. Bettye Gardner, who discussed the 
Anglican oral tradition, at a September program. A video tape 
presentation, "Oral Tradition and the Use of the Griot in African 
Studies," by Madame Nydeye, foreign curriculum consultant 
from Senegal, began they program. 



Projects, from page 5 

Crime and People: Is There a Soultion? University of Maryland 
School of Social Work and Community Planning. Dr. Ernest Kahn 
(301) 528-5100. This project will provide the opportunity for 
citizens and humanities scholars to engage in a dialogue about 
current issues related to crime and incarceration. Dr. Pieter 
Lejins, professor of criminology at the University of Maryland 
College Park, will keynote the first program on crime, the 
problem it presents and its possible solutions. 

Public Relations or Self Regulation: The Future of Private 
Enterprise. The Johns Hopkins University Center for 
Metropolitan Planning and Research and the Baltimore Chamber 
of Commerce. Dr. Robert W. Hearn (301) 338-7171. This project 
will explore selected issues in regulating the conduct of private 
sector business. It will focus on the ethical dimensions of three 
basic strategies designed to enhance and improve the public 
conduct of business activities — self-regulating codes of ethics, 
public economic education and government regulation — in- 
cluding their strengths and weaknesses, feasibility and potential 
effectiveness in shaping and improving business performance 
and public accountability 

Children's Literature Series. United Communities Against 
Poverty. Elva Smith (301) 894-6680. This series approaches 
parents, teachers and librarians in order to promote good reading 
habits and a love for books in children and young adults. Two 
programs concerning how to use literature with children and 
young adults are planned for November, and a "Books are for 
People Fair," which will feature ChrJstmas stories and poems, 
local book-talkers, storytellers and an RIF representative, is 
scheduled for December. 

Roots Forum. Community College of Baltimore. Joan Anderson 
(301) 396-0480. CCB has begun its fall series of forums, radio 
broadcasts and workshops relating to Alex Haley's Roots. The 
November forum "Myth and Folklore: Africa to the United 
States" will be presented by Ruth Davis, Black history instructor 
at CCB in November. Barbara Murray, assistant professor of 
economics will speak in "Black Women and the Family" in the 
December forum. 

Notes, from page 2 

among other activities. He has written numerous articles, 

reviews and books, many in Portuguese. 

• Dr. Don Smith, is chairman of the English department at 



Frostburg State College. He teaches American literature an 
specializes in Faulkner. He was project director for "Literacy i 
America: The Use and Abuse of Language" and has receive 
grants for the National Endowment for the Humanities, includin 
one for consulting and for studying theories and practices i 
composition at the University of Pittsburg. 

• Ms. Betty Uston is a radio broadcast producer for the Voic 
of America. She has also served as a public relations specialisi 
editor of the Burmese Service and production specialist for VOA 
She is also a museum education specialist at the Smithsonia 
Museum in Washington. 




PROJECTS 



Patricia Hunt, acting director of the Maryland Committee 
for the Humanities, distributes literature from the Com- 
mittee's People Projects booth at the September Baltimore 
City Fair. 



The next proposal deadline will be December 15, 1977. Proposa 
will be acted on by January 28, 1978. 



The Maryland Committee for the Humanities 
330 North Charles Street, Room 306 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

Dr. Robert A. Corrigan, Chairman 

Or. Carolynn Raid Wallace, Vice Chairwomen 

Mr. H. Michael Ryan, Jr., Fiscal Officer 

Mr. George Allen 

Mrs. Margaret D. Armstrong 

Dr. Fontaine M. Belford 

Dr. Andrew Billingsley 

Eugene B. Brody, M.D. 

Dr. Joseph W. Cox 

Dr. Thomas Cripps 

Mr. David C. Driskell 

Mrs. Mae E. Dyson 

Mr. John M. Klaus 

Dr. RuthM.OItman 

Mr. Gerald J. Pannick 

Mr. George A. Piendak 

Mr. GarnieA. Poison 

Mr. JohnD. Roth 

Dr. A.J.R. Russell-Wood 

Dr. Don Smith 

Mrs. Betty L. Ustun 

Dr. William H. Wroten, Jr. 

Maria Heyssel, Executive Director 

Patricia L. Hunt, Assistant Director 



NON-Profit 


Org. 


U.S. Postage 


PAID 




Baltimore, 


Md. 


Permit No. 


6371 



h r . Howard Rovelstad 

Libraries 

'LVo University of "*• 

Coiic,;o Park, *. 20740 



humanities & 



PEOPLE PROJECTS 



s. 



Volume 2, No. 4 Jan7Feb. 1978 



* 



U 



Lunchtime at the Peabody 



Music, its composition, its performance and its relevance to 
American life, has been the subject of the Peabody Institute's 
continuing afternoon lecture series, "Music in American Life," a 
People Project funded by the Maryland Committee for the 
Humanities. Two of these hour programs in November featured 
the Baltimore premiere of Richard Wernick's song cycle, 
"Contemplations of the Tenth Muse," and Judith Raskin, soprano 
with the Metropolitan Opera, who spoke on "Making It at the 
Met, Or a Singing Career in America." 

The words to Mr. Wernick's 20-minute song cycle, which was 
commissioned by the Fromm Foundation for the Bicentennial, 
are taken from "Contemplations," a poem written by Anne 
Bradstreet sometime after 1666. 

The song cycle was sung by Elsa Charlston, a member of the 
Musica Viva of Boston and soloist with the Contemporary 
Chamber Players of the University of Chicago, who was ac- 
companied by John Pobb on prepared piano. 

In this poem Anne Bradstreet, who is considered the first 
American Poet of merit, compares the life of humankind and the 
life of nonhuman nature as she observed it in the wooded hills 
near her Massachusetts home. Mr. Wernick used four of the 33 
verses of this poem, including the eighth and the 33rd which 
read: 

Silent, alone, where none or saw or heard, 

In pathless paths I led my wand'ring feet, 

My humble eyes to lofty skies I reared, 

To sing some song my mazed Muse thought meet. 

My great creator I would magnify, 

That nature had thus decked liberally: 

But ah, and ah, again, my Imbecility! 

O Time, the fatal wrack of mortal things, 

That draws oblivion's curtains over kings, 

Their sumptuous monuments, men know them not, 

Their names without record are forgot, 

Their parts, their ports, their pomp's all laid in th' dust, 

Nor wit nor gold nor buildings 'scape time's rust; 

But he whose name is graved in the white stone 

Shall last and shine when all of these are gone. 

Mr. Wernick said his work expanded the use of traditional 
instrumentation through techniques which include plucking the 
strings of the piano and sustaining chords while strumming the 
strings on the inside of the piano. Despite his use of con- 
temporary techniques, the Pulitzer Prize winning composer said 
that his music and anyone else's should "continue to com- 



municate the kinds of things music has communicated for the 
last 1,000 years." 

Speaking on "Making It at the Met, Or a Singing Career in 
America," Judith Raskin discussed the plight of singers, par- 
ticularly opera singers, and music in general in America. 

"It's making it to the Met that is really the issue," she said. 
"We train a great many musicians, but we can't say that at the 
end of that training there will be a job." 

But Ms. Raskin said that if a singer does not plan only to sing 
at the Met, opportunities for opera careers are improving. She 
said that there are now some 40 opera companies in America, 
including the Western Opera Theater, the Texas Opera Theater 
and companies in New England and Seattle. "Where there isn't 
an opera company, there is talk of one," she said. 

She said that contrary to the opinion of some, the arts in 
America are economically solvent. "There is an economic 
problem, but there has always been a worse one," she said. "You 
can't look at the overall picture and say its worse than it was ten 
years ago. It's really better." 

But Ms. Raskin said she is more concerned with the per- 
formers, than the economic future of opera. "I'm concerned with 
artistic values, not money," Ms. Raskin said. She said that 
studying the humanities was a necessary part of a singer's 
training. "If you want to be an artist, you've got to learn about 
history, about language and the rest of it," she said. She added 
that the artist cannot depend on formal education for such 
knowledge. 

Other programs in this Peabody series have included com- 
poser Karel Husa, who spoke on "Composer in America: IsThere 
a National Music?" musicologist Donald J. Grout, who spoke on 
"Musical Scholarship in America," and Richard Kapp, music 
program officer of the Ford Foundation, who spoke on "Foun- 
dations and Music in the United States." The lecture series will 
continue through the spring of 1978. 




Elsa Charlston and Richard Weinick discuss his song cycle after 
the Peabody performance. 



c< 




Claire Sisenwein 



Committee Notes. 



A new staff member has joined the Maryland Committee for 
the Humanities Claire Sisenwein, now a part-time employee of 
the Committee, is researching and assembling data on all 
Maryland county organizations whose activities relate to the 
humanities It is hoped that this research will indicate which 
county groups the Committee has not yet reached and provide 
them with information on how the Committee can benefit them 

Ms Sisenwein, who joined the Committee in October, teaches 
art history at Essex Community College and art-related crafts at 
Catonsville Community College Both courses involve senior 
citizens. She also teaches painting and drawing in her own 
studio. Ms Sisenwein is herself an accomplished artist whose 
works have been exhibited in New York, Pennsylvania and 
Maryland. 

She taught painting and drawing and arranged exhibits for four 
years at the Waxter Center in Baltimore and worked in art 
therapy for handicapped senior citizens at the Waxter Center and 
Spring Grove Hospital. 

Ms Sisenwein said her research will attempt to document the 
needs of county humanities programs and determine where gaps 
exist in the Committee's present funding "I hope my research 
will extend the activities of the humanities to a larger group of 
people throughout the Maryland area," she said. 

Also a commercial artist, Ms Sisenwein created the 
illustration on page four and five of this newsletter 

Husbands and Wives Discuss Dual Careers 

Despite the increasing number of working wives and mothers 
in our society, husbands and wives with dual careers are faced 
with conflicts related to work and family that are often not easily 
resolved 

The pros and cons of dual careers for husbands and wives was 
the topic of a November People Project, "Working Husbands and 
Wives," sponsored by Baltimore New Directions for Women and 
funded by the Maryland Committee for the Humanities. Among 
the participants in this three-program series were Dr. Jeanne 
Stevenson, professor of history at Notre Dame College, and Dr 
William Hug, field coordinator for the Masters program in 
pastoral counseling for Loyola College. 

With the active participation of the audience, these programs 
presented a picture of the changing family, a discussion of these 
changes and how to cope with them. Speaking on "The Modern 
Family," Dr. Stevenson presented a historical analysis of family 
life from pre-colonial years. 

She said the "modern" family is nuclear and characterized by 
individualism, while the "pre-modern" family was corporate and 
characterized by extended, group ties. Dr. Stevenson said that 
while characteristics of the modern family began to appear in the 



United States in the late 18th century, it became more fully 
manifested in the early decade of the 19th century. 

Pre-modern families were based on an economic equality of 
husband and wife "Husband and wife in the colonial family 
were on equal terms at least in one essential-the value and 
degree of the participation in the family economy," she said. 
"The economic places of men and women were contiguous—one 
largely out of doors and in the fields, the other in the home plot 
and in the house," where the woman's side of the economic 
partnership "included but transcended the obligation to 
maintain the home," she said 

Dr Stevenson noted that the change in this equal partnership 
began in the mid-18th century due primarily to the population 
increase and the move away from producing goods for self 
sufficiency to producing them for sale By the mid-19th century, 
the ideal American home, "secluded from the everyday world of 
commerce and politics, was the cradle of American 
civilization where wives and mothers tamed the evil 
propensities of husbands and sons and made them fit par- 
ti( ipants in American democracy and commerce," she said. 

It was not until World War II that women were encouraged to 
seek employment Dr Stevenson noted that one of the most 
significant aspects of the increase in women joining the labor 
force was that "60 percent of all the women added to the labor 
force between 1941 and 1945 were thirty five and older and 
married 

Although women were forced to leave the labor force with the 
return of servicemen in 1945 and 1946, Dr Stevenson said that 
the national crisis of WW II brought about changes in the 
Americ an family that persisted throughout the succeeding three 
dec ades 

The high percentage of working mothers in the labor force 
that persists today is not the deterioration or the demise of the 
"traditional" family, "but an extension or a revival of pre-modern 
family work patterns in which women were expected to con- 
tribute to the family's economy," Dr. Stevenson said 

A< c ording to Stevenson, "Perhaps one of the dilemmas facing 
the contemporary American family is that it has both pre- 
modern and modern characteristics while American society, in 
general, lends support only to the latter, largely a creation of the 
19th century " 

These dilemmas to which Dr Stevenson referred were 
discussed by Dr Hug in the third program of the series, 
"Cooperating and Negotiating" He noted that the biggest 
problem faced by most wives who work, particularly mothers, is 
feeling guilty about their work. For a woman, he said, "guilt is a 
big inhibiter of freedom of choice " He said that "the freedom to 
think about what a person wants to do is something men take for 
granted " 

Dr Hug, who is also a clinical pastoral counselor, said that in 
his own counseling he stresses a pivot approach for husbands 
and wives "You become an ally to your spouse by going after 
what each other wants," he said "Husbands and wives should be 
allies, not adversaries." 



The next proposal deadline will be February 1, 
Proposals will be acted on by March 11, 1978. 



1978. 



The Newsletter for the Maryland Committee for the 
Humanities is a bimonthly publication For extra copies or 
further information, telephone (301) 837-1938 or write 
MCH. 330 N Charles St . Room 306. Baltimore, Md. 
21201 

Editor Barbara Barbiero 



Upcoming People Projects ~ 

Humanities and the People. WBIC-FM. Kenneth Stein (301) 396- 
0404 WBJC is continuing its weekly series of panel-discussion 
programs dealing with the humanities and how they relate to 
human experience These live programs include audience 
participation through comments and questions telephoned to 
the station January programs include: Jan. 4, Poetry as 
Expression; Jan 11, Women in Art in Baltimore; Jan. 25, 
Baltimore, The Wired City February programs include: Feb. 1, 
Art and the Occult, Feb 8, Children's Entertainment in 
Baltimore; Feb. 15, Folks and Film; Feb. 22, Baltimore's One 
Percent for Art Ordinance. 

Creative Drama and Aging. College of Notre Dame. Joyce Lowy 
DiRienzi (301) 435-0100 This two-part seminar is designed to 
train and enlighten people with professional interest in aging. It 
will train such people to utilize the techniques of creative drama 
to reawaken and reaffirm the senior citizen's sense of self, others 
and community It will attempt to instill a better understanding 
of the historical problems of aging and the difficulties senior 
citizens face. This ten-week program will consist of a morning 
seminar, which will include observation of Isabel Burger using 
creative drama techniques with a group of senior citizens, and 
afternoon work shops, which will be centered around creative 
drama theory and related discussions 

Ideas in Visual Form. Museum-Library Partnership. Richard 
Parsons (301) 296-8500. Three programs will be held in January 
and February to explore how public libraries and museums might 
be better adapted to meet community needs. In these programs 
it will be shown how library and museum collections relate to the 
lives of residents of various communities. It is hoped that the 
programs will foster public awareness of the value of museum 
and library collections and activities, and survey public attitudes 
toward museums and libraries. Taking part in the January 12 
program will be Walter Fisher, professor of history at Morgan 
State University. Mrs Jane Davis, professor of history of design 
at the Maryland Institute of Art will take part in the January 19 
program and Dr. Dan Jones, professor in the literature depart- 
ment at Towson State University, will take part in the February 2 
program 

Life as a Quality Experience. Mayor's Advisory Committee on Art 
and Culture. Barbara Parker (301) 396-4588 Two more programs, 
Cross Cultural Baltimore and Urban Mythology, are planned in 
this noon - lecture series which is exploring values and life styles 
that affect the quality of life Dr. Leslie King Hammond, dean of 
graduate studies and art historian at the Maryland Institute of 
Art, will speak on "The Black Visual Artist as an Independent 
Entity in Baltimore," "Baltimore's Centers of Black Artistic 
Energy and Input," and "Black Artistic Expression" and 
"Baltimore: The Community, The City, The Nation, The World," 
in the January Cross Cultural Baltimore series. Dr Seamus Kelly, 
professor of sociology at Essex Community College, will speak on 
"The Myth Versus Reality: Historical Overview and Development 
of Urban Myths," "Problem Solving Myths and their Political 
Importance as it Relates to the Reurbanization Movement," and 
"Mythology, Technology and the Individual," in the February 
Urban Mythology series 

Exploring New Alternatives for Improving the Urban Environ- 
ment. Neighborhood Development Corporation. Sheila 
Thompson (301) 366-1717 This project, which looks at how well 
government agencies are meeting human needs as they relate to 
transportation, recreation, education, housing and social 



systems development, will conclude with two panel discussions 
in January "Quality Education: What Is It?" and "The Human 
Element As a Factor in the Real Acceptance of Social Services" 
will be the topics of these last two programs 

Death and Dying in America: Perspectives of the Humanities. 

Hood College. Dr Dana Cable and Terry Martin (301) 663-3131 
x370. The current concern with issues of death and dying crosses 
many disciplines of the humanities Death is becoming less of a 
taboo topic and people are increasingly looking for a deeper 
understanding of death and issues related to it This project, 
which is concerned with an exploration of death and dying from 
the viewpoint of the humanities, will take place in two phases 
The first phase will involve four programs in Frederick in January 
and February, which will deal with the religious, philosophical 
and cultural issues surrounding death; medical and legal issues, 
children and death, grief and death in literature; and the 
psychology of death, care of the terminally ill and death in music 
and art. The second phase of the program will be conducted in 
the spring 



Series on Genetic Engineering. Villa Julie College and National 
Conference of Christians and jews. Linda Ciotola (301) 486-7000. 
This project is designed to raise public awareness, provide 
education and build the skills necessary to influence public 
policy regarding recombinant DNA research It will attempt to 
educate the public regarding the scientific, legal, medical, 
ethical and environmental issues related to this issue. The first 
phase of this project will include a keynote address by Jules 
Bergman, ABC-TV science editor The address, "What is 
Recombinant DNA Research and Why the Controversy," will be 
followed by a panel discussion with audience participation The 
second phase of the project will be held in March. 

Baltimore: Its Culture and Its Values. The Humanities Institute 
William R Mueller (301) 484-8846. This day-long seminar in- 
tends to show how various aspects of our culture are informed, 
formed and nourished by humanistic disciplines. It hopes to 
bring the audience to a greater understanding of the major in- 
fluences which humanists exert on virtually every aspect of our 
culture Panel I, "The Teaching of the Humanities," will define 
the scope of the humanities and indicate their place in local and 
diverse educational institutions Panel II, "Ethical Principles in 
Business and the Professions," will investigate ethical norms, in 
theory and practice, in the legal and medical professions, and in 
the areas of real estate and development, and investment and 
banking. Panel III, "Philosophical Bases of Ftealing Professions," 
will demonstrate how models of healing grow out of a healer's 
allegiance to a particular metaphysical view of man Panel IV. "A 
Humanistic Assessment of Cultural Institutions," will present 
critical analyses of the major cultural institutions in the 
Baltimore area 

Roots Forum. Community College of Baltimore Joan Anderson 
(301) 396-0480 The last in the series of forums relating to Alex 
Haley's Roots will occur in February Dr Leslie King Hammond 
dean of graduate studies at the Maryland Institute of Art, will 
speak on "Afro-American Art 

Moral Choices in Contemporary Society. Norfh Bethesda United 
Methodist Church Donald Rodgers (301) 566-6194 The last 
three sessions in this six-part series of discussions on moral 
choices will include two January programs on "The Morality of 
Business," at which David R Smith, vice president of Woodward 
and Lothrope and Dr Luther Tyson, director of economic life at 

See People Projects, page 6 



The Humanities: How Important Are They? 



The articles below are illustrations of the need for the humanities 
in our lives. In addition, they attempt to show how the Maryland 
Committee for the Humanities is fulfilling its purpose of 
promoting understanding of the humanities 

State troopers earn more money than the average philosophy 
professor, no poet, Nobel Laureate or local rhymer, is accorded 
the fame whi( h follows the legion of pop culture. Peoples enter 
the humanistic disciplines because of passion, not reason I 
study Tennyson, or teach Plato because I love them, and perhaps 
because of that, because they seem to matter Do they? A 
shrewd and moral chemist challenged me on just this point as I 
was heading off to graduate school "Rats are biting babies to 
death in the basements of Harlem and you are going off to Yale 
to study theology and literature I hope you hate yourself. May 
you have bad dreams always " His angry words have given both 
my graduate work and my professional life that edge produced 
only by anxiety, and intensity bred of discomfort I thank him for 
that It is not a bad thing to have to account for the use of one's 
talents. We are not all born to save the world, but we are all 
responsible to it. and accountable for the state of our own souls. 
Several years ago the great rallying cry on college campus was 
relevance If one were relevant, or what one was teaching was 
relevant, there was no further indication necessary. But no one 
ever thought much about what was meant by that word, not to 
mention what the word itself meant The popular assumption 
was, I think, that what was relevant was "connected " In fact, 
the root of the word is not relatio. "to relate", but releveare. "to 
life up, or relieve " This small discovery was ironic in that it gave 
the arguments of the protestors a sense which, though not in- 
tended, validated what they thought they needed to attack. 

The humanities are the "useless" disciplines. Art history, 
philosophy, theology, classics become travesties when they try 
to justify themselves by riding on the coat tails of sociology or 
political science Tor their strength lies in the very fact that they 
are not immediately related to the problems which plague 
contemporary society The function of the humanities is rather, 
it seems to me, to lift us up, above the pressing, immediate, and 
often agonizing needs of the everyday, and thereby to put them 
into perspective, to give us a new vision of their true con- 
nectedness In other words, the humanities render accessible to 
us not trees but forests And therefore, though "useless," they 
are the most relevant disciplines of all 

This becomes increasingly apparent to me in the community 
outreach, adult education work which I am now doing. When I 
was doing research prior to setting up the Coucher Center for 
Tducation Resources I was told repeatedly, "You'll never get 
adults interested in the liberal arts They'll only study what they 
have to learn, what will get them a better job or more pay." Our 
experience has not borne this out To the contrary, what the 
adults who have flocked to our program seem to have been 
seeking is a way of making sense out of their experience, of 
seeing what it means and how this relates to what they are, and 
what they want to be And they have elected to do this by 
studying art at the Walters Art Gallery, by reading Victorian 
fiction, by exploring the nature of the )ewish and Christian 
traditions-all "useless." all relevant 

Matthew Arnold says that the function of the literature is to 
call out our being at more points, to enable us to be more. The 
humanities pose the essential, the terrible questions: what does 
it mean to be born, to live, to die ? These are not answerable, but 
it is in the attempt to take hold of them that we come to un- 



derstand what it means to be human. And this, I would tell my 
chemist friend, lies at the center of everything. This gives us 
outrage at suffering and the heart to try to heal it. We humanists 
can, after all, have good dreams 

Fontaine Maury Belford 



Anwar Sadat should be awarded a medal by scholars in the 
humanities for his emotional outreach for peace--an outreach 
that brushed aside the barriers of rules, regulations and protocol. 
But alas, I'm afraid present day humanities scholars would be 
caught up in game playing-unable to decide on such an award. 
Yes, caught up and undistinguishable from other role players in 
our technocratic society unable to separate themselves from the 
letter of the law or in this case the rules of diplomatic protocol. 
Would the scholars not echo the plaintive cry of the professional 
diplomats, "Is nothing secret anymore?" 

From my perspective as an administrator of a public agency, I 
see every action, feeling or emotion in our society governed by 



W^^%&%£^Mwe7 an & 




technocracy. Every minute discussion group feels compelled to 
elect a chairman, develop a constitution and by-laws and 
operate by "Robert's Rule of Order " Every action seems to be 
governed by form rather than feeling. Every campus is loaded 
with committees to do this and to do that. Every governmental 
agency does the same. What comes out of this over organized 
agglomerate is moral pronunciamentos with the backbone of 
pabulum and the feelings of a robot. 

It recently took a group of Washington-area businessmen, 
union, civic and religious leaders to recommend that American 
corporations should establish written codes of ethics to state 
their obligations and to provide general guidelines for behavior 
in areas deemed morally ambiguous. No academic humanists 
were identified in this news article. 

Academic humanists where are you? Where have you been? 
Do your disciplines no longer discipline? Does telling it as it is 
mean a whole kit and kaboodle of "alternatives?" Does it mean 
teaching courses in situational ethics or values clarification 
which turns out to be no rights and no wrongs. 

Scholars we need you! The public needs you. We need you to 
put humanism into our technocracy. We need you to undergird 
us. We need you to help understand our past, our present and 



our future We need you to reassure or to warn us We need you 
to help us cope 

The common man needs you in an uncommon way Come 
down from the tower. Come down to the common Teach us to 
put the spirit into the letter of the law 

George E Allen 



What does the historian have to say that is pertinent to the 
problems and concerns of citizens? Or, to put it another way, 
what does the discipline of history have to offer the public in 
humanities programs like those supported by the Maryland 
Committee for the Humanities? Having participated as a history 
scholar in one committee-supported project and attended half a 
dozen other projects funded by the Committee in which 
historians were involved, I have arrived at some of my own 
answers to these questions. 

First, the limitations of history and historians must be 
recognized History is not a crystal ball and historians are not 
prophets who can predict the future based on the lessons of the 
past What the historian can do with history in a public forum is 
bring an objectivity to discussions of current issues. The 
historian has the ability to stand back and from the perspective 
of history analyze events, people and policies on the con- 
temporary scene and tell us what is significant in the long run 




Kjes CiUti 



and what is not. 

Because of its scope, history can offer something that other 
disciplines in the humanities cannot--a broad view of 
humankind's endeavors. History is the parent discipline of the 
humanities and the historian is not limited to any one way of 
looking at civilization The historian may view the past as a 
philosopher, sociologist, anthropologist, and a literary scholar. 
Trained to put together the puzzle pieces that can be gleaned 
from these varied viewpoints, the historian can provide the "big 
picture" from which patterns can be perceived and cause and 
effect relationships detected 

These patterns revealed by the historian in the "big picture" of 
our past can be pertinent in discussions of public policy. I recall 
attending one committee-supported project recently in which a 
historian was asked to review the history of transportation in 
Baltimore City. In her talk she emphasized the effect that dif- 
ferent modes of transportation had on the patterns of residential 
development and economic growth of the city The professional 
planner who followed on the program began his talk admitting 
that experts engaged in planning transportation systems for cities 
like Baltimore were at long last beginning to recognize what 
historians like the previous speaker have known for a longtime-- 



that where and how people live in an urban area is largely 
determined by the kind of transportation available to them I 
believe that it was quite clear to the members of the audience 
that what that historian had been saying had great relevance in 
the discussion of transportation planning for Baltimore City and 
helped focus attention on the impact that a transportation 
s\ stem has on people's lives. 

Historians can also help people gain a sense of identity and 
direction by tracing the origins of their traditions and values and 
describing the contributions of the men and women who came 
before them Communities have called upon historians in 
committee-funded projects to give them a clearer understanding 
of their past so that they could more effectively discuss their 
future as a community. Croups in our population, who until 
recent years have been neglected in the annals of formal history, 
have also sought and received committee support for projects in 
which historians have discussed with the public such topics as 
Baltimore's ethnic heritage, the contributions of Black 
Americans to our nation's history and the changing role of 
women 

While the emphasis thus far has been on what the historian 
can offer the public, it is only fair to ask how participation with 
the public in a humanities program can benefit the historian. It 
has been my experience that the adults who live and work 
outside the institutions where historians teach or pursue their 
research activities ask excellent questions They bring a fresh 
point of view to discussions which can broaden the perspective 
and sharpen the senses of any historian willing to venture out 
into the public forum The cross-ventilation of ideas and 
viewpoints that occurs when scholars engage in dialogue with 
the public is, in my opinion, a major strength of programs 
supported by the Maryland Committee for the Humanities. 

Marianne Alexander 

This article will not attempt to be a fair, impartial, objective 
analysis of history of the Maryland Committee It is an effort to 
assess the continual evolution of a young organization by an 
insider 

In the beginning was the Word The Word was the National 
Foundation on the Arts and Humanities Act of 1965. It was made 
flesh by people unfamiliar with Washington politics and federal 
malaise As with most frontiersmen, the goal (making the 
humanities disciplines visible and felt in American life) became a 
cause. The National Endowment for the Humanities was a 
distinct entity from the other Washington bureaucracies It had 
been separated by Congress from its Siamese twin sister, the 
National Endowment for the Arts The separation was artificaial 
and mechanical since ideally the arts and humanities are ex- 
tensions of themselves It was made to ensure the survival of 
both endowments in an era dominated by numbers, speed, and 
technique Tentatively, the NEH began its existence without its 
more flamboyant sister The Word was made brick and given a 
federal identification number 

The Maryland Committee for the Humanities imitated its 
mother's growth by beginning with a crusading spirit in the 
founders and slowly building a constituency When we started, 
the Committee funded a project idea Because we didn't have 
precedents, we were more flexible about our expectations for a 
project 

Now, the Committee funds an idea and its implementation 
There is an increasing demand for specific information con- 
cerning the participants and budget, and how the director will 
carry out the idea Our forms are more intricate without being 
esoteric. This slowly evolving emphasis on details is due to our 
need to account for a larger budget It is not pure bureaucratic 
sadism 

See Humanities, page 6 



The Corruption of Man Is Followed 
by the Corruption of Language 

Writing about language, Ralph Waldo Emerson said, "A man's 
power to connect his thought with its power symbol and so to 
utter it, depends on the simplicity of his character, that is, upon 
his love of truth, and his desire to communicate it without loss. 
The corruption of man is followed by the corruption of 
language." 

Humankind and its corruption has been a universal topic of 
discussion for centuries. But the corruption of language which 
Ralph Emerson maintains necessarily follows has been of lesser 
concern, which some say reached importance only within the 
last 50 years Since the emergence of television, the rapid ad- 
vancement of technological science and events such as the 
Vietnam War, people have begun to give more attention to 
language and its use on and by society 

All of the humanities flow from language. The corruption of 
language, then, should be of particular concern to people 
working in the humanities The thoughts below are from three 
scholars who attended the conference on values held by the 
Maryland Committee for the Humanities in late spring. They are 
presented in an attempt to stimulate further thought on the 
corruption of language and how it effects us all . 

Jonathan Kozol author, educator, leader of the Free School 
movement: "Language is intensely political. Time and again I 
notice students are discouraged from the use of the first person 
pronoun. Reference is always to the third person pronoun in- 
stead. (The teacher) has been trained for years that it is not 
professional to say anything she believes. The higher you get up 
in the academic ladder, the higher the levels of alienation. 
Whereas in the third grade you could only use the third person 
pronoun, when you get to (college) you can use the subjunctive 
and the conditional The subjunctive is the verb form of 
hypothesis 'as if.' Conditional is the syntax of tangential 
possibilities. Third person is the pronoun of self abdication. 
Together they constitute the ideal rhetoric of a manor woman 
whose hands are skilled, but whose heart is dead, whose con- 
science is in exile It is perfect preparation for the Vietnam 
bombardier--but more formidale yet in the man who sent him 
there: 'It was done Somebody else did it -but not I.'" 

Josephine Jacobs, poet: "What is happening to the verbal 
process is a very terrifying thing I think it has relation to all the 
arts. The way we discuss the humanities is by some sort of verbal 
communication. I think that language, if I may use a very crude 
and brutal simile, has been gang-raped. It's been subject to an 
assault from so many areas, and with such simultaneous ferocity, 
it has become the medium in which we lie to each other and are 
lied to. We're subject to lies in advertisements, in politics and 
from the entire cosmeticized process that we get in the media. 
People tell me constantly over the radio and elsewhere to go to 
my 'friendly' grocer or to 'the bank that cares.' This is false. The 
grocer is not my friend, nor does he wish to be, in the true sense 
of the word. The bank, in the sense that it is trying to convince 
me that it does, does not care Some say this is not major. It is 
major. The first thing the barbarians did was burn libraries. I 
think we're burning libraries. Our reasoning processes are being 
disrupted by the continual barrage of falsehood which is implicit 
in the language that we are hearing and speaking. We need an 
outcry People need to protest. How can we discuss the arts or 
anything else when we are using a debased language." 

Joseph Wiezenbaum, MIT professor of computer science and 
author of Computer Power and Human Reason. "We' re trapped by 
our language. The answer is to learn many languages. We're all 
part of a Mr. Magoo world. He sees what he wants to see. He 



believes the world that he has reconstructed out of his destorted 
perspectives is the real world. That's the kind of world we live in 
too, we have very limited vision, almost tunnel vision. We have 
all sorts of instruments for seeing the world, all kinds of different 
lenses. These lenses determine what we see. This is our per- 
spective apparatus and its most vivid manifestation is our 
language. Since the beginning of modern science, the language 
which has gained the greatest legitimacy is the language of 
science. The dominance of science which is due in large part to 
the very success of science in transforming the world, has 
legitimized the language of science above all other to the point 
that other languages are considered illegitimate altogether. It is 
necessary that we be able to learn to see the world through many 
different perspectives, science being one, from the point of view 
of various arts, from various religions. The way out is for each of 
us to constantly practice many, many languages." 

Humanities, from page 5 

Of course, the latest Congressional legislation has made a 
dramatic change in our focus. The state humanities committees 
are no longer tied to discussion of public policy issues. We can 
fund any program which discusses the humanities whether or not 
it is in the context of an issue. More types of programs are 
possible. 

With all due respect to our first project directors, and without 
trying to sound self-congratulatory, the Maryland Committee for 
the Humanities is reaching more people with our programs. 
More people are thinking about the values by which they live. 
(The Committee can't take sole credit for this; we are but one 
vehicle to the humanities ) The eternal difficulty is proving that a 
person is somehow better for having access to humanistic 
perspectives How do we know when we're successful? 
Humanities scholars can't point to a material product as the 
scientist or artist. Since the humanist deals with thoughts, the 
intangible, there is seldom conclusive evidence of ac- 
complishment The Committee must be content in the 
knowledge that there is a great need for our programs, and as 
best we can, we fulfill those needs. 

Despite the appearance of more forms and new legislation, the 
Committee's emphasis has not changed. We help promote, 
encourage, and sustain the humanities. It is heartening to know, 
"We are not submerged in process; what we do matters, though 
we seldom learn how And what we do therefore deserves all the 
attention we can muster "* p atr|cia L Hunt 

* This quote was taken from Dr. William Hugh Kenner, 
professor in the Humanities at Johns Hopkins University It was 
printed in The Johns Hopkins Magazine, November 1977, page 
19. 

People Projects, from page 3 

the United Methodist Church, will speak, and "Law and 
Morality," at which Judge Douglas H. Moore of the District Court 
of Maryland will speak. At the February program, "Moral 
Education," Dr James C Logan, professor of systematic 
theology at Wesley Theological Center in Washington, DC, will 
be the principal speaker. While these programs are coordinated 
with the weekly article series appearing in the Washington Post- 
it is not necessary to be an active participant in the course to 
attend the lectures. 

Westside Popular Culture: A Historical Analysis of Life Styles, 
Values, Heritage of Future Wetipquin Community Development 
Club, Inc. Rachel Hall (301) 873-2330 and Marie A. Dashiell (301) 
873-2144. This series of five seminars, which will begin in 
February and continue through June, intends to involve the local 
residentsiof the WestsideCommunities of Wicomico County in 
the history, heritage and future of their popular culture. 



Humanities and the People 


Calendar of Events-January-Februarv 

WBJC-FM91 5 


Every Wednesday 
Jan. 4-Feb. 22 
7 p.m. 


Quality Education: What Is It? 


Neighborhood Development Corporation 
University of Baltimore, Langsdale Auditorium 
Baltimore. Maryland 


Tuesday, Jan. 10 
7 30 p. m. 


The Human Element As a Factor in the 
Real Acceptance of Social Services 


Neighborhood Development Corporation 
Union Baptist Church, Druid Hill and 
Lafayette Avenues, Baltimore, Maryland 


Thursday, Jan. 12 
7:30 p.m. 


The Morality of Business 


North Bethesda United Methodist Church 
10100 Old Georgetown Road 
Bethesda, Maryland 


Thursday, Jan. 12 
8 p.m. 


Ideas in Visual Form 


Museum Library Partnership 
Dunbar Community Center 
Baltimore, Maryland 


Thursday, Jan. 12 
7.30 p.m. 




Shriver Waybnght Auditorium 
Carrol County Historical Society 
Westminster, Maryland 


Thursday, Jan. 19 
8p.m. 




Lansdowne Middle School Auditorium 
Lansdowne, Maryland 


Thursday. Feb. 2 
7:30 p.m. 


Cross-Cultural Baltimore 


Mayors Advisory Comm. on Art and Culture 
Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St. 
Baltimore, Maryland 


Jan. 18, 19,20 
12-1 p.m. 


The Humanistic Approach to Death 


Hood College 
Rosenstock Auditorium 
Frederick, Maryland 


Monday, Jan 30 
7:30 p.m. 


Current Issues in Death 


Same as above 


Monday, Feb. 6 
7:30 p.m. 


Personal Attitudes and Issues in Death 


Same as above 


Saturday, Feb. 18 
9:30 a.m. -4 p.m. 
Saturday, Feb. 25 
9:30 a m -4:30 p.m. 


Film Preview: Black Politics 
in Maryland 


Dual Image, Inc. 

Maryland Commission on Afro-American 
History and Culture, 12 West Madison Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 


Sunday, Jan. 22 
3-6 p.m. 


Law and Morality 


North Bethesda United Methodist Church 
10100 Old Georgetown Road 
Bethesda, Maryland 


Thursday, Jan. 26 
8 p.m 


Creative Drama and Aging 


College of Notre Dame 
Fourier Lounge 
Baltimore, Maryland 


Feb. 6, 13,20,27 
10a.m. -2:30 p.m. 


Wests ide Culture: 
Our Unique Heritage 


Wetipguin Comm. Development Club, Inc. 
Wetipquin Comm. Center 
Wetipquin, Maryland 


Wednesday, Feb. 8 
8p.m. 


Afro- American Art 


Community College of Baltimore 

Nursing Auditorium, 2901 Liberty Heights Road 

Baltimore, Maryland 


Thursday, Feb. 9 
2p.m. 


Moral Education 


North Bethesda United Methodist Church 
10100 Old Georgetown Road 
Bethesda, Maryland 


Thursday, Feb. 9 
8p.m. 


Urban Mythology 


Mayor's Advisory Comm. on Art and Culture 
Community College of Baltimore, Harbor Campus 
Forum Lecture Hall, Lombard and Market Place 
Baltimore, Maryland 


Feb. 21, 22, 23 

12 -1 p.m. 


What Is Recombinant DNA and 
Why the Controversy? 


Villa Julie College 

Student Center, Greenspring Valley Road 

Stevenson, Maryland 


Saturday, Feb. 25 
1-4 p m. 


Baltimore: Its Culture and Its Values 


The Humanities Institute 

College of Notre Dame, Knott Science Center 

Baltimore, Maryland 


Saturday, Feb. 25 
9:30a.m. -4:30p.m. 



Clip and Mail to 

The Maryland Committee for the Humanities 
330 North Charles St , Rm. 306 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

PLEASE SEND 

□ Grant application package 

PLEASE NOTE 

D My organization may be interested in sponsoring a proiect 
.vould like to be on your mailing list 

□ ! would like a staff member to discuss a project with my organization 

LI As a Humanities scholar, I am mteretsed in discussing public policy issues 
with an adult audience 



NAM _ 
ADDRESS 



Name of Organization — 



East Baltimore Poses for a People Project 



East Baltimore, its people and their life 
st\ Irs is the subject of a series of exhibits 
of blac k and white photographs in an 
upcoming People Project. "East Baltimore: 
Tradition and Transition." The project will 
begin this winter and continue through the 
spring. 

Linda Rich, project director, conceived 
the idea tor the project while teaching a 
< lass in documentary photography at the 
Maryland Institute of Art She and two 
students decided to photograph an urban 
community Fast Baltimore was a logical 
choice 

Ms Rich and the two photographers 
have been taking pictures throughout East 
Baltimore "When we went into East 
Baltimore, it immediately stirred up a lot 
of interest among the people and church 
and community organizations," she said 
Photographs exhibited at St. Elizabeth's 
Church were received so well by the 
i ommunity that Ms. Rich decided to seek 
funding for a larger project and submitted 
a proposal to the Maryland Committee 

At least three exhibits, the first at City 
Hall and the rest in East Baltimore, will be 
part of the project funded by the Maryland 
( ommittee. Each will last two weeks and 
will include an opening session with a slide 
show followed by discussion Topics for 
the exhibits, which will contain some 50 
photographs each, will include "A History 
of a Documentary Photography Project," 
"Photography as Popular Culture" and 
"Ethnic ity— Family Folklore " 

Ms Rich said that the Baltimore 
Museum of Art plans to conduct a 
traveling exhibit of the photographs in 
September 

Informal exhibits (photographs only) are 
currently being organized in various 
locations in East Baltimore in order to 
show the residents resists of the work thus 




far and to stimulate interest in the up- 
coming exhibits funded by the Maryland 
( ommittee 

She said the residents of East Baltimore 
have been a great help in suggesting 
(people and places to photograph "It's 
through them that we've gotten as far as 
we have," she said. 

Ms Rich said that seeing the 
photographs makes the East Baltimore 
residents "visually aware of their com- 
munity in a way they haven't been 
before." She hopes the project "will 



present a visual-historical record of a 
period of time within the community 
which in time it will be very important " 

Other programs in this Peabody series 
have included composer Karel Husa, who 
spoke on "Composer in America Is there a 
National Music?" musicologist Donald J. 
Grout, who spoke on "Musical Scholarship 
in America," and Richard Kapp, music 
program officer of the Ford Foundation, 
who spoke on "Foundations and Music in 
the United States." The lecture series will 
continue through the spring of 1978. 



The Maryland Committee for the Humanities, Inc. 
330 North Charles Street, Room 306 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



Dr Robert A. Corrigan, Chairman 

Dr. Carolynn Reid Wallace, Vice Chairwomen 

Mr. H. Michael Ryan, Jr., Fiscal Officer 

Mr George Allen 

Mrs Margaret D. Armstrong 

Dr Fontaine M. Belford 

Dr. Andrew Billingsley 

Eugene B. Brody, M.D. 

Dr Joseph W. Cox 

Dr. Thomas Cripps 

Dr. David C. Driskell 

Mrs. Mae E. Dyson 

Mr. John M. Klaus 

Dr Ruth M. Oltman 

Dr Gerald J. Pannick 

Mr. George A. Piendak 

Mr GarnieA. Poison 

Mr JohnD. Roth 

Dr A. JR. Russell-Wood 

Dr. Don Smith 

Mrs. Betty L. Ustun 

Dr. William H. Wroten, Jr. 

Maria Heyssel, Executive Director 

Patricia L. Hunt, Assistant Director 






iii.-.VSowJird i{ ovelstad 

fho University of ; -<t. 
Col lo.-e Park, Hi. 20740 



NON-Profi 


Org. 


U.S. Post 


age 


PAID 




Baltimore, 


Md. 


Permit No. 


6371 



humanities & 
public policy 



PEOPLE PROJECTS 



Volume 2, No. 5 March/April 1978 



Panel Examines Death 
and Dying in America 

Life, from the miracle of birth to the moment of death, has 
been described and embraced in our thoughts, conversations 
and literature for centuries. But death, dark and inevitable, has 
been shrouded by mystery and linked to misery in past and 
contemporary American culture. 

"Death and Dying in America," a series of four public forums 
directed by Hood College psychology professor Dana Cable and 
graduate student Terry Martin, raises many of the complex issues 
related to death. Sponsored by the Maryland Committee for the 
Humanities, the project, originated at Hood College in late 
January, will continue into the spring at Salisbury and Frostburg 
State colleges. 

Project Director, Dr. Cable, and his assistant, Mr. Martin 
conceived of the project to "bring people face to face with the 
reality of death as a natural part of life and to offer ways of 
examining death from the viewpoint of the humanities." 

Five panelists from the fields of law, social work and religion 
composed the panel of the February 13 program, "Death: 
Current Issues and Perspectives." 

The choice of suicide and its prevention were discussed by 
Rev. Richard Schwinger, director of Contact-Baltimore, a 24- 
hour crisis intervention service. Although he has personal beliefs 
on the individual's right to suicide. Rev. Schwinger said that he 
and his co-workers "cannot concern ourselves with the right to 
die when our callers are reaching out for help." 

Rev. Schwinger cited three main motivations for suicide: a 
significant change in one's life perceived as threatening; the 
introduction of new persons into one's life; and a change in role 
or status, frequently a promotion involving added responsibility. 
He encouraged the audience to heed suicide signals from friends 
and relatives and to elicit open communication from such in- 





Project Director, Dr. Dana Cable and assistant, Terry Martin. 



dividuals. 

The topic of suicide led to a discussion of the right to die by 
Dr. Ernest Kahn, associate professor of social work at the 
University of Maryland. Dr. Kahn posed such complex questions 
as: "What is American social policy about the right to die? Does 
the state have control over the lives of its citizens? Who should 
make the policy for the right to die? What is life?" 

According to Dr. Kahn, the right to die phenomenon 
represents the historical development and advancement of 
modern technology. "Through technology," he said, "we can 
maintain life for longer periods of time." He suggested that many 
patients and their loved ones resist the prolonging of a painful 
existence and want the choice of life or death. 

The legal aspects of the right to die were discussed by trial 
attorney, Gregory Hayword. He described the proposed Natural 
Death Act of Maryland which would allow individuals to 
compose directives to withhold life-sustaining procedures in the 
face of imminent death. Mr. Hayward pointed out that the legal 
issues of euthanasia are complicated by insurance claims and 
current medical ethics. 

Rev. A. Dickerson Salmon, rector of Frederick's All Saints' 
Episcopal Church, presented a religious perspective on the issues 
of suicide and euthanasia. "As a Christian," he said, "direct 
suicide is not permissible." He added, "I am thoroughly con- 
vinced that 50 per cent of all suicides could be prevented if you 
and I were equipped to be friends, lovers, confidantes and 
counselors." 

Although it is not advocated by the Church, Rev. Salmon 
spoke out strongly in favor of euthanasia, under certain cir- 
cumstances. He posed the following questions regarding the 
right to die: "Why-what is the motivation? How--what manner 
of action? When--are there viable alternatives? Who--is the 
subject of the action and is he the decision-maker?" 

"The decision," Rev. Salmon said, "should rest, if possible 
with the dying person and then with his family, clergy and 
physician." 

Neither the panelists nor the audience could provide concrete 
answers which have puzzled generation of Americans. But the 
final speaker, attorney Seymour B. Stern, offered practical 
advice on the financial intricacies of wills and inheritance. 

Although there is no state law requiring a written will, Mr. 
Stern explained that oral wills are not valid in Maryland. "In the 
absence of a will," he said, "there is a mechanism through 
common law for distribution of your assets." 

"The problem is," he continued, "that without a will, your 
property may well go in directions which would have been 
undesired and distressing to you." 

Mr. Stern briefly described the systems of inheritance and 
federal estate taxes on the property of the deceased. He con- 
cluded that the best advice he could offer was to thoroughly plan 
and prepare for death-financially, if not psychologically. 



Newsletter of the Maryland Committee for the Humanities and Public Policy 



Joseph Duffy Heads NEH 



Joseph Daniel Duffy was sworn in on October 18, 1977 as the 
new Chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities. 
Mr. Duffy, nominated in August by President Carter, succeeds 
Ronald S. Berman who held the position from 1971 to January 
1977 

Mr. Duffy outlined his perspective and goals for the 
Endowment at his nomination hearing before the Senate 
Committee on Human Relations on September 9. 

In his opening statement, Mr. Duffy described the study of 
humanities as "a key to the kind of learning and knowledge 
essential to a free and vital society," without which we would be 
"ill-equipped to face the future." 

"The Endowment," he continued, "is one expression of the 
Nation's concern both to acknowledge and to encourage in- 
tellectual excellence." Opportunities for men and women of all 
regions and tastes "should be expanded through the 
strengthening of local institutions of humanistic inquiry and 
enterprise." 

As chairman, Mr. Duffy's foremost concern will be "to in- 
crease access to the manifold riches of humanities for scholar, 
teacher, student and citizen alike." He said that he will promote 
"a partnership between the state humanities organizations and 
the Endowment" to encourage the interest of all citizens. 

A native of West Virginia, Mr. Duffy is a graduate of Marshall 
University and holds graduate degrees from Andover Newton 
Theological School, Yale University and the Hartford Seminary. 

Before joining the Endowment, Mr. Duffy served as assistant 
Secretary of State for Educational and Cultural Affairs. His 
previous posts have included: chief executive officer and 
spokesman for the American Association of University 
Professors, professor at Hartford Seminary and Yale University, 
policy advisor to President Carter in the 1976 campaign and 
chairman of the Democratic National Committee's Task Force on 
Education. 



Carter Supports Humanities 

President Carter demonstrated his support for the Arts and 
Humanities in a new budget submitted to Congress in late 
January. The President asked for a larger increase in dollars for 
the National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities than any 
preceding president. 

Carter proposed a total of $149.6 million, up from last year's 
$123.5 million, for the Arts Endowment. Last year's $121 million 
for the Humanities Endowment was increased to $145.6 million 
in this year's proposal. 

In a message to Congress, President Carter said, "Americans 
are increasingly aware that the arts and humanities preserve and 
transmit our heritage, enrich our lives, and contribute 
significantly to the social and economic well-being of our 
nation. This year's substantial increases in the budgets for the 
arts and humanities endowments demonstrate my strong belief 
in the value of these programs." 

Both Joseph D. Duffy, humanities chairman, and Livingston L 
Biddle, Jr., chairman of the arts endowment, announced theii 
intent to reach "under-served" populations through broader 
programs at the state and municipal levels. About $40 million 
would be available in the budget for allocation to the state arts 
and humanities agencies in bloc grants of $265,000 to $275,000. 




New NEH chairman Joseph D. Duffy. 

NEH Sponsors Youth Projects 

Two new programs, Youth Projects and Youthgrants, are being 
offered by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). 
NEH Youth Projects is an experimental program designed to 
encourage organizations and institutions that deal with children 
and adolescents outside of the formal classroom to offer par- 
ticipatory learning experiences in the humanities. The Youth- 
grants program provides support directly to young people for 
their own projects in the humanities. For further information, 
please contact either: 

NEH Youth Projects 

M.S. 103 

Office of Youth Programs 

National Endowment for the Humanities 

Washington, DC. 20506 
or 

Youthgrants 

M.S. 900 

National Endowment for the Humanities 

Washington, DC. 20506 

White House Humanities 
Conference Proposed 

What are the humanities? What is the role of the humanities 
within the educational system? What is the relationship of the 
humanities to the workplace and other areas of life? 

These questions and many others central to the understanding 
and expansion of the study of the humanities are presently being 
posed in legislation calling for a White House Conference on the 
Humanities in 1979. White House, seepage 4 



The Newsletter for the Maryland Committee for the 

Humanities is a bimonthly publication. For extra copies or 

further information, telephone (301) 837-1938 or write 

MCH, 330 N. Charles St., Room 306, Baltimore, Md. 

21201. 

Editor: Karla Rabin 





Schedule of Events March/April 




Title 


Sponsor 


Date 


Humanities and the People 


WBJC-FM9 5 


Every Wednesday 
March 1 April 12 
8p.m. 


Music in American Life 


Peabody Institute 
Concert Hall 
Baltimore, Maryland 


Every Wednesday 
March 1-May 3 
12p.m 1 p m 


Classics of the French Cinema 


Baltimore Film Forum 
Baltimore Museum of Art 
Bartimore, Maryland 


Every Thursday 
March 2 30 
8p.m 


Conference on Bartimore History 


University of Baltimore 
Maryland Historical Society 


March 3, 4 
9:30a.m. -3:30p.m. 




B b Museum 


Friday, March 3 
7 p.m. 


Humanistic Perspectives on 
China: Classical and Contemporary 


St. Mary's College 

St Mary's City, Maryland 


March4,5, 11, 12, 18, 19 
Saturday, 8:50a.m. -8:30 p.m. 
Sunday, Mormng-3:00p.m. 


Grieving. . .and Alone 


Widowed Persons Service 
Salisbury State College 
Salisbury, Maryland 


Saturday, March 4 
9a.m. -4p.m. 




Sinai Hospital 

Belvedere Ave at Greenspring 

Baltimore, Maryland 


Saturday, April 15 
9a.m. -4p.m. 




Adult Education Center 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 


Saturday, April 29 
9a.m. -4p.m. 


The Media and Their Impact 
on Society and Social Values 


Goucher College 
Kraushaar Auditorium 
Towson, Maryland 


Saturday, March 4 
9a.m. -4:30p.m. 


Creative Drama and Aging 


College of Notre Dame 
Fourier Lounge 
Baltimore, Maryland 


March 6, 13,20 
April 3, 10,17,24 
10a.m. -2p.m. 


Wetipquin Culture: 
Our Unique Heritage 


Wetipquin Comm. Development Club, Inc. 
Asbury Methodist Church 
Nanticoke, Maryland 


Wednesday, March 8 
7:30 p.m. 




Wallertown Community Hall 


Wednesday, April 5 
7:30 p.m. 


Caribbean-Americans Speak: 
Child-Rearing for a Multi- 
Cultural Society 


Bowie State Foundation 
Four Corners Elem. School 
University Blvd. 
Silver Spring, Maryland 


Friday, March 10 
7:30p.m. 


Views of Life from 

the Other Side: 

The Prison Experience 


University of 
Baltimore 
Theatre Project 
Preston & Cathedral Sts 
Baltimore, Maryland 


Sunday, March 12 
2p.m. 

March 14Et21 
7:30p.m. -10 p.m. 


The Ethics and Equity of 
Affirmative Action in 
Glenarden, Maryland 


Glenarden People 
Project Committee 


Wednesday, March 15 
7:30 p.m. 


Life as a Quality Experience 


Mayors Advisory Comm. on Art & Culture 
Baltimore Civic Center, VIP Room 
Baltimore, Maryland 


March 21, 22,23 
12noon-1 p.m. 




Walters Art Gallery Auditorium 
600 North Charles Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 


April 18, 19,20 
12noon-1 p.m. 


Town Meeting Project 


Antioch College 

Stone House, LongreachVillage Comm. Center 

Columbia, Maryland 


Thursday, March 30 
8 p.m. 




Phelps Luck Bern. School 
Phelps Luck Dr., Longreach 
Columbia, Maryland 


Thursday, April 20 
8p.m. 


Death and Dying in America 


Hood College 
Frostburg State College 
Frostburg, Maryland 


Saturday April 8 
9a.m. -4 p.m. 


Hunting: An Inquiry Into Its 
Need or Value 


A Better World, Inc. 
Adult Education Center 
Vol. Fireman's Room 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 


Saturday, April 8 
9a.m. -5p.m. 


The Jewish Experience 


The Jewish Historical Society of Md. 
For details call Dr. Lenora Nasi 
(301 ] 922-3649 


April 9-15 


East Baltimore: Tradition and 
Transition 


Maryland Institute of Art 
City Hall Gallery 
Baltimore, Maryland 


Monday, April 17 
Wednesday, April 19 
6:30p.m. -8:30p.m 



Nationwide Conference on 
Business and Society 

The Council of Better Business Bureaus, funded by a $175,000 
grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, is 
conducting a series of nationwide panels on Business Respon- 
sibilities to Society. 

For the first time, corporate leaders, government officials, 
distinguished scholars and community representatives will meet 
to analyze and seek solutions to the following issues facing both 
business and consumers: 

March 2, Business Responsibilities in Product Design and 
Manufacture (Columbia University, NY.) . 

April 5, Disclosure Responsibilities of Business (University of 
California at Berkeley). 

May 10, Guidelines for Business when Societal Demands 
Conflict (Loyola University, Chicago). 

June 1, 2, Responsibilities of Multinational Corporations 
(Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.). 

For further information, please contact: 

Elizabeth T. Boris, Ph.D. or 

Lottie L. Mosher 

(201) 862-1227, 1253 

Council of Better Business Bureaus 

1150 17th Street, N.W. 

Washington, DC. 20036 

Scholars Needed 

The MCH needs the continued professional involvement of 
scholars in American Studies, Archaeology, Art History and 
Criticism, Classics, Comparative Religion, Ethics, History, 
Jurisprudence, Linguistics, Literature, Modern and Classical 
Languages, Philosophy and those areas of the Social Sciences 
that are largely historical or theoretical in content. Scholars are 
needed in one or all of the following areas: 

Planning. Each project is developed by community 
representatives and scholars who consult on humanities content, 
topics, speakers and format. 

Implementation. Scholars are asked to be speakers, panelists, 
discussion leaders and resource persons. Additional duties could 
include writing papers, articles, preparing bibliographies, 
consulting on film or media projects and project research. Each 
scholar would be expected to become familiar with the project 
and present material related to his particular discipline. 
Honoraria are paid to participants. 

Evaluation. The MCH is interested in hiring scholars for project 
evaluation. The responsibilities involve following and attending 
a project and submitting written evaluations of programs and 
materials. 

These challenging opportunities are open to all Maryland 
scholars . Please send your resume to the MCH office. 



NEH Offers Short Story Films 



"The American Short Story," a highly acclaimed series of nine 
films originally shown on PBS, is available for use in state 
humanities programs. The series was made possible by a grant 
from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). 

The Maryland Committee for the Humanities (MCH) and 
the NEH are very interested in making the series available to 



adult, community, civic and service groups. An underlying theme 
of the series--the examination of American values— makes the 
possibilities for group discussion, lectures, and further reading 
virtually limitless. A booklet is supplied to help plan these ac- 
tivities. 

The MCH is looking for proposals from groups interested in 
planning and implementing the series for public use. The 
responsibilities will include contact with community and 
humanities scholars, program developement and im- 
plementation, and scheduling and distribution arrangements. If 
your group is interested in making an application, please contact 
Maria Heyssel or Patricia Hunt at MCH (301) 837-1938 for further 
details and proposal forms. Deadlines: Preliminary letter due 
March 23, 1978. Final proposal due April 21. The grants are 
awarded on a competitive basis and will be announced on May 
8, 1978. 

If your community group or organization is interested in using 
all or part of this series for a program, please contact the MCH 
office. To date, the films have been used by themselves as well 
as in a variety of larger programs. A museum presented "Bernice 
Bobs Her Hair" and "I'm A Fool" in connection with an 
exhibition of early twentieth-century American art. A church 
group showed "The Music School" as part of a marriage 
workshop and "Almos' A Man" as the basis of parent-teenager 
values discussion. "Soldier's Home" has been presented before a 
number of veterans' groups. A prison director based weekly 
group talks for inmates on the entire series. 

Other films include: THE BLUE HOTEL, THE JOLLY CORNER, 
THE DISPLACED PERSON and THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

White House from Page 2 

Congressman John Brademas (D-lnd.) with the co-sponsorship 
of James Jeffords (R-Vt), Frank Thompson (D-N.J.), Carl Perkins 
(D-Ky ) and Albert Quie (R-Minn.) introduced the bill on 
October 27, 1977. 

According to Rep. Brademas, a White House Conference 
would allow discussion of "crucial issues concerning the future 
of the humanities in the United States." He continued, "It would 
give concerned persons from the humanities, education, 
business and labor, private foundations and government at every 
level the opportunity to exchange ideas and consider new ap- 
proaches to these issues." 

Joseph Duffy, chairman of the National Endowment for the 
Humanities, testified that "public concern for the conservation 
of our cultural resources knows no bounds," and that people are 
"also concerned with the dissemination, use and increased 
accessibility of our cultural resources." 

If the bill is passed, state conferences will precede the White 
House Conference of 1979. 

The Adams Chronicles Available 

"The Adams Chronicles, "a 13-episode filmed history series, is 
currently being distributed under a grant from the National 
Endowment for the Humanities. 

Groups interested in using the series for a People Project are 
welcomed to submit proposals to the Maryland Committee for 
the Humanities (MCH). Non-school adult groups such as 
libraries, museums, prisons, hospitals and non-credit continuing 
adult education programs constitute appropriate audiences for 
Committee-funded projects. 

A viewer's guide to the series and preview prints of "The 
Adams Chronicles" (for a five-day trial) are available at no cost. 
For further information, contact the MCH. 



Upcoming People Projects 



be presented to promote a better understanding of his complex 
and often emotionally charged controversy- 



Humanities and the People. WBjC - FM. Kenneth Stein (301) 396- 
3404 WBJC is continuing its weekly series of panel discussion 
arograms dealing with the humanities and their relation to 
iuman experience. These live programs include audience 
aarticipation through comments and questions telephoned to 
he station. March programs include: March 15, Old Baltimore: 
A Trip Down Memory Lane; March 22, The Teaching of Art; 
March 29, Street Theatre in Baltimore. April's programs include: 
April 5, Auctions and Auctioneers; April 12, A Look at the City. 



Classics of the French Cinema. Baltimore Film Forum, Baltimore 
Museum of Art, Enoch Pratt Library. Helen Cyr. (301) 396-4616. 
The final five films of an eleven-part series will be presented and 
discussed by local professors and authorities who will focus on 
:he importance of each feature and its relationship to film 
listory. The following films will be shown: March 2, "Symphonie 
Pastorale"; March 9, "Monsieur Vincent"; March 16, "Six in 
Paris"; March 23, "Four Nights of a Dreamer"; March 30, "The 
Wild Child." 



Town Meeting Project. Antioch College. Reginald Williams (301) 
730-9175. In a series of monthly forums moderated by noted 
humanities scholars, adult residents of Columbia and Howard 
County will have the opportunity to discuss the relationship 
between public policy and the quality of human life. Discussion 
topics will include. March 30, Governance in Columbia and 
Howard County; April 20, Role of Government and the Quality 
of Human Life; May 11, Columbia Governance: Special Tax 
District Plan. 



The Media and their Impact on Society and Social Values. 

Coucher College. Dr. Lawrence Munns (301) 825-3300 x327. 
Television and violence, cable television, the media and 
government are among the discussion topics of this one-day 
symposium on the role of the mass media in American society. 
Scholars and practitioners will conduct workshops and dialogues 
on eight sub-topics of the major theme. 



East Baltimore: Tradition and Transition. Maryland Institute of 
Art. Linda Rich (301) 669-9200 x50. A visual historical record of 
the evolution and revitalization of East Baltimore in the 1970 / s 
will be created through this exhibition of photographs which 
reflects the strength and pride of the area's residents, opening at 
City Hall on April 17. Dr. Suzanne Green will present a lecture, 
"Sidelights of East Baltimore" on April 19, also at City Hall. 



Death and Dying in America: Perspectives of the Humanities. 

Hood College. Dr. Dana Cable and Terry Martin (301) 663-3131 
x370. The issues surrounding death and dying will be examined 
by scholars and specialists in the fields of religion, philosophy, 
social work, psychology and art in this day-long symposium. It is 
the second phase of the Hood College program. 



Grieving. ..and Alone: Widowed Persons Service, Sinai Hospital. 
Barbara Cahn (301) 367-7800 x8858. The purpose of this project is 
to provide fundamental information from scholars and prac- 
titioners regarding historical, theological, philosophical, literary 
and psychological aspects of widowhood and the grief process in 
a symposium which will take place in four locations throughout 
the state. Participants and panelists will exchange personal 
experiences and humanistic knowledge relating to this largely 
ignored problem. 



Life as a Quality Experience. Mayor's Advisory Council on Art 
and Culture. (301) 396-4588. Two more programs, the Powerless 
Public and Censorship, are planned in this noon-lecture series 
exploring values and issues that affect the quality of life. James 
Floyd, graphics instructor at the Philadelphia College of Art, will 
speak on "Strategic History andTacticsof a Powerless Society," 
"Elusive Reality and the Powerless Individual," and "Security, 
Reality and the Powerless Individual." Lincoln Johnson, 
professor of fine arts at Goucher College and Baltimore Sun art 
columnist, will speak on "The Impulse to Censor. Examples from 
the Past," "Varieties of Contemporary Consorship," and 
"Authority and iLicense: The Search for Standards," in the April 
Censorhsip series. 



Caribbean-Americans Speak: Child-Rearing for a Multi-Cultural 
Society. Bowie State Foundation. Dr. YvetteMay (301) 596-3142. 
The fourth in a series of five forums, this seminar deals with 
rearing children in a multi-cultural and multi-ethnic society. 
Humanities scholars will present and discuss ideas on the in- 
tegration of the multi-cultural identities of young children in the 
primary and secondary care-giving environments. 



Hunting: An Inquiry Into Its Need or Value. A Better World, Inc. 
Dr. Gerald Schneider (301) 649-2304. Professionals in wildlife 
management and humanities scholars will discuss the division 
created by hunting issues between persons and organizations 
interested in the welfare of wildlife. Both sides of the issue will 



Westside Popular Culture: A Historical Analysis of Life Styles, 
Values, Heritage of Future. Wetipquin Community Development 
Club, Inc. Rachel Hall (301) 873-2330 and Marie A. Dashiell (301) 
873-2144. This series of five seminars which began in February 
and continues through June, involves the local residents of the 
Westside Communities of Wicomico County in this history, 
heritage and future of their popular culture. 



Creative Drama and Aging. College of Notre Dame. Joyce Di 
Rienzi (301) 435-0100. This seminar is designed as a program for 
senior citizens and people with professional interest in aging. It 

See Projects, page 6 



Projects, from page 5 

will encourage the use of creative drama techniques to reawaken 
and reaffirm the senior citizen's sense of self, others and 
community. This ten week program will consist of a morning 
seminar led by Isabel Burger, using creative drama techniques 
with a group of senior citizens. Afternoon workshops will be 
centered around creative drama theory and related discussions. 

Humanistic Perspectives on China: Classical and Contemporary. 

St. Mary's College of Maryland. Dr. Henry Rosemont, Jr. (301) 
994-1600 x226. A three-weekend symposia of public lectures, 
panel discussions, slide talks and exhibits dealing with China's 
rich cultural tradition will be presented by nine distinguished 
scholars from the fields of art, philogophy and religion, history, 
politics and literature. A major aim of the project is to acquaint 
residents of the rural St. Mary's County with universal humanistic 
disciplines through the examination of China. 

Music in American Life. Peabody Institute. Dr. Elliot W. Calkin 
(301) 837-0600. Music, its composition, its performance and its 
relevance to American life, is the subject of this continuing 
afternoon lecture series. Each one-hour program consists of 
lecture, recital and roundtable discussion: March programs 
include: March 1, Piano Music by Black Composers; March 8, 
American Music, What is It?; March 15, The National 
Endowment for the Arts and its Music Program; March 22, 
American Music Viewed from Europe. April's programs include: 
April 5, Should a Composer Talk about his own Music; April 12, 
The Critic meets his Public; April 19, The Patron of Music and 
the Composer; April 26, Music, Muscians and Hollywood. In 
May: May 3, American Music and the American Musician 
Today. 

The Conference on Baltimore History. University of Baltimore 
and the Maryland Historical Society. Dr. Randall Beirne (301)- 
727-6350 x378. This two-day conference on the evolution and 
growth of Baltimore will consist of lectures and panel discussions 
by leading scholars in the i areas of education, documentary 
theatre, ethnic communities and the Jewish community. The 



Friday and Saturday sessions will be held at the Maryland 
Historical Society and the Friday evening session will be held at 
the B & O Railroad Museum. Admission is free, but tickets must 
be obtained in advance from the Historical Society, the 
University of Baltimore, Room 121, or the ticket office of the 
B&O Museum. 

Identity and Universality in American Culture: The Jewish 
Experience. The Jewish Historical Society of Maryland. Dr. 
Lenora Nast (301) 922-3649. People of all ethnic backgrounds are 
invited to share the uniqueness of the Jewish experience in this 
project examining the linkages of all Americans. The Jewish 
contribution to art, architecture, theatre, language and music 
will be topics of analysis during the April 9-15 program. For 
further information, please call (301) 922-3649. 

Views of Life from the Other Side: The Prison Experience. 

University of Baltimore. Dr. Derral Cheatwood (301) 727-6350 
x378. This program consists of two professional seminars and an 
exhibition of photographs taken in two state prisons. The first 
seminar, on March 14, will be conducted by three university 
professors from the fields of psychiatry, American studies and 
history. The second seminar, on March 21, will be conducted by 
a jail warden, the seargent of the guards at the Maryland 
Penitentiary and the director of the Community Residence 
Center. The photography exhibition opens formally on March 12. 
The programs will focus on the security institution as a place of 
work and life which fosters a particular and unique view of life. 



The next deadline for 

submitting proposals is 

April 21, 1978. 



The Maryland Committee for the Humanities, Inc. 
330 North Charles Street, Room 306 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



Dr. Robert A. Corrigan, Chairman 

Dr. Carolynn Raid Wallace, Vice Chairwomen 

Mr. H. Michael Ryan, Jr., Fiscal Officer 

Mr. George Allen 

Mrs. Margaret D. Armstrong 

Dr. Fontaine M. Belford 

Dr. Andrew Billingsley 

Eugene B. Brody, M.D. 

Dr. Joseph W. Cox 

Dr. Thomas Cripps 

Dr. David C. Driskell 

Mrs. Mae E. Dyson 

Mr. John M. Klaus 

Dr. Ruth M. Oltman 

Dr. Gerald J. Pannick 

Mr. George A. Piendak 

Mr. Garnie A. Poison 

Mr. John D. Roth 

Dr. A.J. R. Russell-Wood 

Dr. Don Smith 

Mrs. Betty L. Ustun 

Dr. William H.Wroten, Jr. 

Maria Heyssel, Executive Director 

Patricia L. Hunt, Assistant Director 



NON-ProfitOrg. 
U.S. Postage 

PAID 

Baltimore, Md. 
Permit No. 6371 



JiJ r. toward Povclatad 

L ibrurios 

f Aie diversity of i-Jd. 

College Park, Ma. 20740 



humanities & 

olicy 



PEOPLE PROJECTS 



^ime 27NoXMay/June 1978 



Committee Holds Projects 
Directors Conference 



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Although the People Projects funded by 
the Maryland Committee for the 
Humanities (MCH) vary widely in theme, 
project directors face many common 
problems, questions and concerns. For 
instance, how can a project director 
interest the media and the public in an 
upcoming event? How can scholars be 
encouraged to participate? What steps 
should be taken to plan and implement a 
successful program? 

Nearly 100 project directors, committee 
members and communications 

practitioners met at the Baltimore Hilton 
Hotel on April 5 for a full day of discussion 
and problem-solving. "People and 
Projects," the third conference of its kind 
to be sponsored by the MCH, provided a 
unique opportunity for persons interested 
in the humanities to meet and exchange 
ideas 

Following a welcome by Committee 
director Maria Heyssel, Gary Messinger, 
program officer for the National 
Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) 
spoke on the continuous growth of the 
state humanities programs. He said that in 
1970, the NEH created six state programs 
with budgets of $100,000 each. In 1979, 
$20 million will be allocated to state 
humanities programs in all 50 states and 
Puerto Rico. 

Mr Messinger added, "The NEH will 
soon establish humanities programs in 
Guam, the Virgin Isalnds, American 
Samoa and Washington, DC." 

In the keynote address, Dr. Carolynn 
Reid Wallace, Dean of Bowie State College 
and vice chairman of the MCH, discussed 
"The Importance of the Humanities." 

The continued development of man's 
technological capabilities, according to 
Dr Wallace, has gradually eroded the 
rituals and values that shaped our cultural 
fabric She added that through humanistic 



endeavors, man must seeV an 
understanding of himself and his 
environment. 

Urging the audience to "lift the 
humanities off the printed page," Dr. 
Wallace said, "Humanities projects should 
reflect the values not only of scholars, but 
of the man on the street as well." 

Because many project directors have 
had little or no experience in the 
promotion of events, nine public relations 
and media specialists conducted panel 
discussions on "Effective Publicity 
Techniques." Guest speakers presented 
the "how-tos" of newspaper, radio and 
television publicity, as well as general 
public relations campaigning. 

Paul Umanski, a public relations 
representative from Baltimore's Sinai 



jpital, suggested four main outlets for 
ilicity messages: newspaper releases, 
'spot announcements on radio and 
television, feature stories in local 
newspapers and talk showsland interviews 
on radio and television. 

The appeal of the subject and the 
importance of timing were discussed by 
Elaine Stein of WBAL-radio. She said, 
"Make sure your projects have a wide 
appeal; in addition, schedule the project 
so that it doesn't coincide with a similar 
event." 

Janet Covington of WMAR-TV reminded 
project directors that People Projects give 
organizations increased visibility in the 
community. The most crucial aspect of 
each project, she said, is the planning 
stage. 

She added, "Pinpoint your audience and 
the demand for the project, set concrete 
goals and choose the strong points of your 
project to promote." 

See CONFERENCE, page 3 




Dr. Carolyn Reid Wallace delivers keynote address. 



Newsletter of the Maryland Committee for the Humanities rJ 



Marshall Confirmed 

Dr. Geoffrey Marshall was recently confirmed as the director 
of the newly created Office of State Programs of the National 
Endowment for the Humanities. Previously, Dr. Marshall worked 
with the state programs as assistant director of the Division of 
Public Programs. The new Office of State Programs, which 
reports directly to the chairman, is responsible for a budget of 
$18.5 million. 

A native of Pennsylvania, Dr. Marshall attended Franklin and 
Marshall College in Lancaster, Pa. for his undergraduate study 
and Rice University, where he was awarded his graduate degrees. 
Before coming to the Endowment in December of 1974, Dr. 
Marshall spent 10 years at the University of Oklahoma. 

Endowment Names 
Deputy Chairman 

John Whitelaw, executive director of the National Air and 
Space Museum, was appointed on March 30 to be one of three 
deputy chairmen of the National Endowment for the 
Humanities. 

Mr. Whitelaw, 51, will supervise improvement of the 
endowment's management procedures in a newly created 
position. 

The endowment has had only one deputy director, B.J. Stiles, 
who is in charge of policy, planning and public affairs. 
According to Endowment chairman, Joseph D. Duffey, a third 
deputy for programming will be named shortly. 

Caribbean-Americans 
Speak 

[For centuries, immigrants have flocked to 
America in search of prosperity, freedom 
and happiness. For some, the uplifting of 

I roots led to the fulfillment of dreams far 
beyond their expectations; for others, 
immigration marked the onset of racial 
and ethnic persecution, economic disaster 

[and familial conflict. 

"Transcultural Children: Child-rearing 
Jfor a Multi-Cultural Society" is a People 

»vl ^^ Project directed by Yvette May, assistant 

professor of early childhood education at 
Towson State University. In a series of 
Dr. Leith Mullings seven forums, humanities scholars, 

concerned members of the community and public policy makers 
in multi-cultural education meet to discuss the conflicts which 
arise between family socialization and societal acculturation. 

In 1977, Mrs. May directed three forums examining the child- 
rearing practices and concerns of Indians, Chinese-Americans 
and Hispanic-Americans. On March 10, 1978, "Caribbean- 
Americans Speak," an exploration of the unique problems faced 
by Caribbean families in America, was held in Silver Spring, 
Maryland. Nearly 100 persons attended the evening forum. 

The keynote address was delivered by Dr. Leith Mullings of 
Columbia University's department of anthropology. Dr. Mullings 
presented an account of past and contemporary problems 
encountered by Caribbeans in adapting to a new society. 
According to Dr. Mullings, Caribbean-Americans face a two-fold 
problem: the difficulties in migration itself and the institutional 

See CARIBBEAN, page 5 




New Media Guidelines and Deadlin 

The Maryland Committee for the Humanities (MCH) 
announces a new policy for media production grants including 
film, radio and television programs. Because of the size and 
complexity of media grants, the following special deadlines have 
been set for 1978: 

Preliminary proposal-June 15, 1978 
Final Proposal-July 15, 1978 
The decisions will be announced on September 15, 1978. For 
copies of the new guidelines, please contact the MCH office. 

St. Mary's City Recreates Past 

Planning your summer getaway? Instead of venturing out-of- 
state or to the usual coastal resort, consider a weekend in St. 
Mary's City, Maryland. Under a grant from the Maryland 
Committee for the Humanities, the St. Mary's City Commission is 
recreating the year 1688 in an experiment in living history. 

"St. Maries Citty" was Maryland's colonial capital for 60 years. 
Each weekend this summer from July 15 to August 27, visitors are 
invited to tour the reconstructed State House of 1676, the town 
inn, print shop, probate office, upper class house for members of 
the Governor's Council and a plantation with crops and 
livestock. 

A cast of 20 will add authenticity to the scene by reenacting 
the lives of craftsmen and townspeople. The audience will be 
encouraged to debate the issues of 1688, many of which remain 
relevant today. In addition to the historical sets, special events 
will be held on Saturdays, including: a day devoted to 17th 
century children's games, a poetry festival, Militia Day, Farm 
Day and a display of tidewater Indian culture. 



National Conference on 
Public Attitudes of Mentally III 

The Community Imperative will be the topic of a national 
conference to be held in Washington, D.C. from May 31 to June 
2, 1978. This conference is part of a two-year project sponsored 
by the National Institute for Mental Health and the National 
Endowment for the Humanities. The meeting will bring together 
mental health professionals, consumers, community groups, 
media and humanists to examine public attitudes toward the 
mentally ill, quality of care, and conflict between the mentally 
ill and the communities in which they live. 

For further information, please contact: 

Barbara Klaczynska 

Suite 1019 

Horizon House Institute 

5555 Wissahickon Avenue 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19144 

(215) 438-0575 



The Newsletter for the Maryland Committee for the 
Humanities is a bimonthly publication. For extra copies or 
further information, telephone (301) 837-1938 or write 
MCH, 330 N. Charles St., Room 306, Baltimore, Md. 
21201. 

Editor: Karla Rabin 





Calendar of Events - MAY and JUNE 




Title 


Sponsor 


Date 


Music in American Life 


Peabody Institute 
Concert Hall 
Baltimore, Maryland 


Wednesday, May 3 
12p.m. -1 p.m. 


City Walls: The Baltimore 
Murals Project 


Baltimore Museum of Art 
Baltimore, Maryland 


Sunday, May 7 & 21 
2p.m. 

Sunday, June 4 
2p.m. 


Wetipguin Culture: 
Our Unique Heritage 


Wetipquin Comm. Dvlpmt. Club, Inc. 
Community Center [San Domingo] 
Sharptown, Maryland 


Wednesday, May 10 
7:30 p.m. 




Whitehaven, Maryland 


Wednesday, June 14 
7:30p.m. 


The Right to Die: The Bio- 
Ethical Frontier 


Baltimore Hebrew College 
Harford Community College 
Belair, Maryland 


Wednesday, May 10 
7:30 p.m. 


Town Meeting Project 


Antioch College 
Stone House, Longreach 
Village Comm. Center 
Columbia, Maryland 


Thursday, May 1 1 & 25 
7:30 p.m. 
Thursday, June 1 
7:30 p.m. 


Grieving... and Alone 


Widowed Persons Service 
The Classroom Building 
Hagerstown Jr. College 
Hagerstown, Maryland 


Saturday, May 13 
9a.m. -4 p.m. 




Holloway Hall 
Salisbury State College 
Salisbury, Maryland 


Saturday, June 3 
9a.m. -4p.m. 


Life as a Quality Experience 


Mayor's Advisory Comm. on 
Art and Culture 
Boyd Theatre 
601 Light Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 


Thursday, May 18 
Noon-1 p.m. 


A History of Remington-A 
Midtown Community of Baltimore 


Remington Improvement Assoc. 
Church of the Guardian Angel 
335 West 27th Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 


Monday, June 5 
7:30 p.m. 


Humanistic Education and 
Public Interest Groups 


Western Maryland College 
Westminster, Maryland 


Friday, June 9 
7:30p.m. 

Saturday, June 10 
9a.m. -5p.m. 

Sunday, June 11 
9a.m. -3 p.m. 


New Theatre Institute 
Public Forum 


New Theatre Festival 
( For details call Alvin Kraizer 
[3011837-1930 


June 11-18 


Workshop on Ethics and 
Public Policy 


Center for Philosophy and 
Public Policy 
St. John's College 
Annapolis, Maryland 


June 18-24 


St. Maries Citty, 1688 


St. Mary's City Commission 

State House Lawn 

St. Mary's City, Maryland 


Every Saturday and 

Sunday 

July 15-August 27 

1 p.m. -4:30 p.m. 



CONFERENCE, from page 7 

Both Stein and Covington encouraged project directors to call 
them for advice or air time. "But," Stein cautioned, "don't 
contact us until you have a fairly firm idea in mind." 

Directors of People Projects face a large hurdle from the 
outset, according to EarlArnett, a feature reporter for the 
Baltimore Sun. He said, "The media are personality and event- 
oriented, not idea-oriented. Most editors and reporters are 
relatively unconcerned with the humanities as news." 

To compensate for this lack of interest, Arnett suggested that 
project directors carefully analyze the workings of a particular 
medium, then "fit the project into that medium." 

He continued, "Identify the individuals in media who 



demonstrate their interest in the humanities. They might 
consider developing a feature story around your project." 

Additional conference sessions included: "Involvement of 
Humanities Scholars," in which participants discussed the role 
and value of scholars in humanities projects, films and 
videotapes of past projects, and an evaluation of "A Vocational 
vs. A Liberal Arts Education." 

In the final session of the afternoon, experienced project 
directors and committee members offered the following advice 
to newcomers: seek assistance from persons sincerely committed 
to the subject, have a back-up staff to cover potential drop-outs, 
assign overlapping duties to insure task completion and rely 
heavily on personal, mail or telephone contact in inviting the 
public and the media. 



Hunting — Necessity, Recreation or Evil? 



Hunters, philosophers, anthropologists, 
wildlife conservationists, animal 

defenders, writers and concerned 
community members met on April 8 for a 
one-day conference on "Hunting: An 
Inquiry Into Its Need or Value." 

The conference, sponsored by A Better 
World, Inc. under a grant from the 
Maryland Committee for the Humanities, 
was held at the University of Maryland's 
Center for Adult Education. A diverse 
group of 21 experts addressed an audience 
of more than 100 persons . 

According to project director, Dr. 
Gerald Schneider, "The purpose of the 
conference is to bring people together who 
don't normally talk to one another." He 
added, "Pro-hunting groups and humane 
groups are often unable to find a middle 
ground on which to meet. I see this 
meeting as a first step in that direction." 

The first panel of the meeting was 
composed of scholars from the field of 
anthropology. Dr. William Stuart of the 
University of Maryland stressed the 
contribution of hunting to human culture. 

He said, "We owe our human nature to 
our hunting legacy. The stalking and 
carrying of game were important factors in 
the evolution of the nuclear family, the 
tribe and the division of labor." 

Dr. Stuart also stated that the extinction 
of most animal species is unrelated to 
hunting practices. "Hunting," he 
concluded, "will ultimately be judged 
more as a contribution to culture than as 
an evil." 

Fellow panelists, Dr. Robert Lee 
Humphrey, Jr. of the George Washington 
University and Dr. Ellis R. Kerley of the 
University of Maryland, supported Dr. 
Stuart's premise that hunting, rarely a 
direct cause of wildlife extinction, was 
historically a means of survival and is 
today an integral part of our culture. 

In the second session, hunting as a 
wildlife management tool was vehemently 
attacked by James Kovic of Defenders of 
Wildlife and defended by Dr. Peggy Saur 
of the New York State Department of 
Environmental Conservation and Dr. John 
S. Gottschalk of the International 
Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. 

Mr. Kovic opposed hunting as a wildlife 
management tool because "game 
management has been used to manipulate 
wildlife populations to abnormally high 
densities for the recreation of hunters." He 
added, "Nature needs no help from game 
management in controlling the population 
levels of wild animals." 

Dr. Saur, active in New York state game 



An inquiry Into 
Its Need or Value 




Dr. Gerald Schneider, project director, listens intently to panelists. 



management, directly opposed Mr. 
Kovic's contentions. She said, "Wildlife 
management has proven to be an absolute 
necessity in some cases. If population 
levels are not maintained within the 
carrying capacity of the land, animals will 
deplete farm crops, destroy forestry, enter 
suburban and urban areas in search of 
food, collide with vehicles and, in extreme 
cases, die of starvation." Both Dr. Saur 
and Dr. Gottschalk emphasized that 
wildlife is a renewable resource which, if 
properly managed, can greatly benefit 
mankind. 



"Nature needs no help from 

game management in 

controlling the population 

levels of wild animals." 



The first of two afternoon sessions 
focused on the thics of hunting. Dr. John 
Hoyt, president of the Humane Society of 
the United States, argued that most 
hunting groups inaccurately perceive the 
role of humane societies. 

"More than 90 per cent of humane 
societies' funds," he said, "are spent on 
insuring that animals are treated humanely 
in laboratories, rodeos and other sources 
of potential mistreatment." 



The adventure of the stalk and the 
sporting aspect of hunting were conveyed 
by avid hunter Sheila Link, a writer and 
consultant to the National Rifle 
Association. 

She said, "The kill is perfunctory--the 
bona fide hunter hunts for the challenge of 
the pursuit, not for the pleasure of the 
kill." Ms. Link added that the skilled 
hunter, who kills cleanly and quickly, is 
ignored by the press. Instead, it is the 
"slob hunter" who is featured in the media 
as the typical hunter. 

After several hours of debate, both pro- 
and anti-hunting panelists convened for a 
session on common ground. 

"Greater strides can be taken," Dr. 
Schneider said, "if friends and foes of 
hunting can agree on measures that will 
benefit everyone." 

Ecologists and conservation writers 
agreed that habitat preservation and 
protection of rare wildlife species are 
essential. In addition, they agreed upon 
the need to strengthen penalties for 
violation of hunting laws, to crack-down 
on "slob hunters" and to create new laws 
that would lessen the cruelty in shooting 
and trapping wildlife. 

Closing the discussion, James Kovic of 
Defenders of Animal Rights suggested that 
human and hunting groups pursue parallel 
rather than joint paths to these goals. The 
suggestion, undisputed by either side, 
served as a reminder that a true middle 
ground in the hunting controversy is yet to 
be reached. 



Upcoming 
People Projects, 



Town Meeting Project. Antioch College. Reginald Williams (301) 
547-8000 ext. 75. In a series of monthly forums moderated by 
noted humanities scholars, adult residents of Columbia and 
Howard Counties will have the opportunity to discuss the 
relationship between public policy and the quality of human life. 
Discussion topics will include: May 11, Columbia Governance: 
Plan to create a Special Tax District; May 25, County-wide 
Concerns with Respect to Governance; June 1, Columbia: The 
Garden People Grow on. 

Grieving... and Alone: Widowed Persons Service, Sinai Hospital. 
Barbara Cahn (301) 367-6700 ext. 8858. The purpose of this 
project is to provide fundamental information from scholars and 
practitioners regarding historical, theological, philosophical, 
literary and psychological aspects of widowhood and the grief 
process in a symposium which will be held in two locations. 
Participants and panelists will exchange personal experiences 
and humanistic knowledge relating to this largely-ignored 
problem. 

Westside Popular Culture: A Historical Analysis of Life Styles, 
Values, Heritage of Future. Wetipquin Community Development 
Club, Inc. Rachel Hall (301) 873-2330 and Marie A. Dashiell (301) 
873-2144. This series of five seminars which began in February 
and continues through June involves the local residents of the 
Westside communities of Wicomico County in the history, 
heritage and future of their popular culture. May 10, "Women, 
Minorities and Politics of the Westside Communities," and June 
14, "Westside Culture: Present and Future." 

Music In American Life. Peabody Institute. Dr. Elliot W. Galkin 
(301) 837-0600. Music, its composition, performance and 
relevance to American life is the subject of this continuing 
afternoon lecture series. The final one-hour program consists of 
lecture, recital and roundtable discussion. May 3, American 
Music and the American Musician Today. 

Humanistic Education and Public Interest Groups. Western 
Maryland College. Dr. Aleine Austin (301) 764-2844. Members of 
diverse public interest groups and humanities scholars will meet 
for this three-day conference to determine the common 
educational needs in the humanities. Discussion will focus on 
the ways in which educational programs in the humanities might 
assist both the unique and the common concerns of such groups. 
Registration will be held at 4 p.m. on Friday, June 9. 

St. Maries Citty, 1688: An Experiment in Living History. St. 

Mary's City Commission. Dr. Burton Kummerow (301) 994-0779. 
The City Commission will "recreate" the year 1688 in Maryland's 
first capital by reconstructing major buildings and businesses 
from the period. Visitors are invited to sample frontier life and to 
: debate issues that affected Marylanders in 1688 and continue to 
perplex our society 300 years later. 

City Walls: The Baltimore Mural Project. The Baltimore Museum 
I of Art. Susan Cumins (301) 396-6307. The murals of the city and 
their cultural impact are the subjects of a panel discussion and 
bus tour which are being held in conjunction with an exhibition 
at the museum. The exhibition, April 30-June 18, and related 
activities are designed to reflect the relationship between the 



artist and the community. May 7, Panel Discussion; May 21 and 
June4-Bus tours. 

The New Theatre Institute Public Forum Program. The New 

Theatre Festival. Alvin T. Kraizer (301) 837-1930. A week of 
seminars, discussions and demonstrations lead by experts in 
linguistics, anthropology, urban studies and artists will focus on 
theatre as an educational tool in the community. The major 
topics to be considered are: Populism vs. Elitism, Aural Theatre- 
The Word at its Source, and Ritual in Theatre. 

Life As A Quality Experience. Mayor's Advisory Committee on 
Art and Culture. Elizabeth Dryden (301) 396-4575. A final 
program. Art in Public Places, will be presented in this noon 
lecture series exploring the values and issues that affect. the 
quality of human life. Diana Johnson, art historian, will speak on 
'Public Art: The Baltimore Renaissance under the Schaefer 
Administration." 

The Right to Die: The Bio-Ethical Frontier. Baltimore Hebrew 
College. Dr. Ernest Kahn (301) 528-5100. The right to die 
stipulates that individuals may determine the circumstances of 
their own death and decide whether their lives should or should 
not be prolonged by medical technology. The public is invited to 
attend this forum which will provide a basis for informal 
discussion of the legal, ethical and philosophical issues 
involved. 

A History of Remington. Remington Home Improvement 
Association. Donald and Mae Mortimer (301) 243-7387. Slides, 
maps and photographs of this midtown Baltimore community 
will be shared with the local residents to heighten cultural 
awareness and pride. 

Workshop on Ethics and Public Policy. Center for Philosophy 
and Public Policy. Dr. Peter Brown (301) 454-4103. Designed for 
teachers, scholars, and practitioners in ethics and public policy, 
this one-week program will focus on current issues including: 
ethics of public officials, health care policy, welfare reform, 
human rights and foreign policy. Small seminars and informal 
discussion will follow presentations by noted scholars and 
practitioners in the field. 

CARIBBEAN, from page 2 

racism which is built into the American system. 

She explained that in migrating, strong family ties are broken 
and Caribbean peoples are alienated from the mores of the new 
culture. 

"Caribbean-Americans migrate for economic reasons," Dr. 
Mullings said. "But instead of prosperity," she added, "they find 
economic instability and the deterioration of major cities." 

Coupled with the cultural and economic barriers, Caribbeans 
must contend with institutional racism, said Dr. Mullings. 

"Not only is there a conflict between black and white," she 
said, "but between Afro-American and Caribbean-American as 
well." 

Migration and institutional racism converge and form specific 
problems, according to Dr. Mullings. These problems include: 
the assimilation of children by parents unfamiliar and 
uncommitted to the new culture, a burden on the schools to 
bridge the gap between two cultures, the conflict between 
Caribbean adults and Americanized children and the language 
barrier which severely restricts children in schools. 

The identification of problems by Dr. Mullings was followed 
by three separate group discussions moderated by Dr. Edwin 

See CARIBBEAN, page 6 



Mini Grants Available 



Small grants are available to PTA's, garden clubs, Rotary 
Clubs, community organizations, book groups, labor unions, 
church groups, cultural institutions, historical societies, farmer's 
groups, homemaker's clubs and many other adult community 
groups to pay for a daytime or evening film and discussion 
program 

Funds will be provided to cover the cost of a speaker such as a 
historian, literary scholar, art historian, legal scholar, 
philosopher or language professor and the rental and handling 
fees for the following films: 

THE ADMS CHRONICLES-a thirteen part U.S. history series in 
dramatic form which was shown on television. The series depicts 
the life of the Adams family and the early days of the United 
States. 

THE AMERICAN SHORT STORY SERIES including 9 separate 
films dramatizing the short stories. 



An Introduction to the Series 

PARKER ADDERSON, PHILOSOPHER 

THE JOLLY CORNER 

THE BLUE HOTEL 

I'M A FOOL 

SOLDIER'S HOME 

BERNICE BOBS HER HAIR 

ALMOS'AMAN 

THE DISPLACED PERSON 

THE MUSIC SCHOOL 



Author 

Ambrose Bierce 
Henry James 
Stephen Crane 
Sherwood Anderson 
Ernest Hemingway 
F. Scott Fitzgerald 
Richard Wright 
Flannery O'Connor 
John Updike 



Name of Croup 



Your Name. 



and Address 



Name(s) of film(s) 



Dates needed 



Please clip the following coupon and mail to the MCH office. 
An information packet will be sent to your group. 

* These films are being made available to service and 
community oriented groups whose members are over 18 years of 
age through a grant from the National Endowment for the 
Humanities to Learning in Focus and the Consontium of 
University Film Centers. Schools, universities and libraries must 
rent or purchase films at standard rates through Perspective 
Films in Chicago. However, funds are available to all for project 
expenses related to the film series. 



CARIBBEAN, from page 5 

Nichols of the National Institute of Mental Health, Dr. D. Elliot 
Parris of Howard University's Caribbean studies program and Dr 
Gregory Rigsby, professor of Caribbean literature at the 
University of the District of Columbia. 

The moderators then shared the suggestions of group members 
with the total audience. Among the many ideas mentioned, 
participants favored establishing a medium for communication 
with the school system and the promotion of positive elements 
of Caribbean culture to discourage Caribbean children from 
shedding all traces of their heritage In addition, the notions of 
providing institutionalized Caribbean-American services to the 
larger community and the formation of a strong cultural 
organization were well-received. 



Impatience and anger laced many of the comments aired in 
the discussions. But hopes ran high by the end of the evening- 
hopes that the gulf between generations of Caribbean-Americans 
will not be widened in the future and hopes that this People 
Project, "Transcultural Children" will set the stage for action. 



The next deadline for submitting 
proposals is July 15, 1978. 



The Maryland Committee for the Humanities, Inc. 
330 North Charles Street, Room 306 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



Dr Robert A Corngan. Chairman 

Dr Carolynn Reid Wallace. Vice Chairwomen 

Mr H Michael Ryan. Jr . Fiscal Officer 

Mr George Allen 

Mrs Margaret D Armstrong 

Dr Fontaine M Belford 

Dr Andrew Billmgsley 

Eugene B Brody. M D 

Dr. Joseph W Cox 

Dr Thomas Cnpps 

Dr David C Driskell 

Mrs Mae E Dyson 

Mr John M Klaus 

Dr Ruth M Oltman 

Dr Gerald J Panmck 

Mr George A Piendak 

Mr GarnieA Poison 

Mr John D Roth 

Dr A J R Russell-Wood 

Dr Don Smrth 

Mrs Betty I Ustun 

Dr William H Wroten, Jr 

Maria Heyssel. Executive Director 

Patricia I Hunt. Assistant Director 




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humanities & 
public policy 



PEOPLE PROJECTS 



Volume 2, No. 7 July/August 1978 



Stage Fighting- 
Art and Magic 

"Brush Up Your Shakespeare," a four- 
part People Project sponsored by Essex 
Community College, got off to a rousing 
start on June 7 with a lecture- 
demonstration on weaponry and 
techniques of combat in the staging of 
Elizabethan drama. 

Robert Murray, Stunt and Stage Fight 
Director with the North Carolina School of 
the Arts, accompanied by two of his 
accomplished students, Ken Shelton and 
Steve Hall, demonstrated to an audience 
of 170 persons the rigorous training 
involved in enacting the duels and brawls 
which compose many of Shakespeare's 
plays. Murray, who currently teaches both 
acting and stage fighting, has performed 
extensively on Broadway and in television. 

The art of stage combat, Murray said, 
involves mastering gymnastics, mime, 
acting and a bit of "magic." He stressed 
the importance of top physical 
conditioning and daring in the feats he 
requires of his students. Beginning with 
elementary tumbling and mat exercises, 
Murray directed Shelton and Hall through 
an accelerated version of their normal 
class activities. The audience watched 





Murray and Ellis relax offstage. 



Hall and Shelton strike 

intently as the two young men progressed 
from simple rolls to mid-air flips with 
rapiers and daggers in hand Murray 
translated these actions into meaningful 
steps in the actor's learning process. 

He explained, "Every exercise performed 
here tonight is incorporated in stage 
combat. Tumbling is used in street fighting 
and brawl scenes, rolls are seen repeatedly 
in sword fighting, and the mini-trampoline 
allows an actor to 'fly' over bushes and 
walls and to make dramatic entrances " 

The difficulty of the maneuvers and 
the innate hazards of stage combat were 
heightened by the total absence of 
protective clothing and face masks Safety 
drills and developing trust in one's partner, 
Murray explained, are the most critical 
aspects in teaching young actors to 
competently handly the unwieldy 
weapons. 

"Although the rapiers, broadswords and 
daggers are replicas," Murray said, "their 
weight and shape can inflict serious 
damage should a mishap occur." 



traditional pose before duel. 

Fhroughout the evening, Murray 
highlighted the differences between stage 
and film production. "Film actors and 
directors have it made," he said, not 
without a trace of envy. "When a 
physically demanding scene is required," 
he continued, "the film actor steps out and 
the stunt man steps in. When an actor 
makes a mistake or a stunt man fails to 
perform his feat, a film director simply 
reshoots the scene." 

On the stage, Murray said, the actor 
must be able to execute his own stunts- 
the first time they are attempted In 
addition, he pointed out that physical 
motions can be much faster on film than 
on stage Murray maintained that stage 
combat becomes an actor's artistic 
creation, an illusion in which his slight of 
hand evokes the violence of the fight 
Shelton demonstrated that an unobtrusive 
slap on his own knee creates the sound of 
his opponent's head being snapped 
backwards by a vicious kick. The final 
SeeFICHTINC, page 4 



Newsletter of the Maryland Committeeeforthe Humanities 



^ 



MCH Seeking New Members 

The MCH is seeking new Committee members to replace those 
who are retiring in September The Committee is composed of 
scholars and representatives from business, cultural and civic 
groups All prospective Committee members must have a 
background and interest in the humanities The Committee's 
responsibilities include reading proposals, attending five day- 
long meetings a year, and occasionally participating in special 
conferenc es 

Anyone who submitted a resume during our last turnover and 
was not selected to serve will still be considered Those 
interested should send their resumes to the Membership 
Committee, c /o Maryland Committee for the Humanities, 330 
North Charles St., Room 306, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 by July 
31, 197« 

Maryland Scholars Needed 

The MCH needs the continued professional involvement of 
scholars in two spec ific regions - the Eastern Shore (Salisbury) 
and Western Maryland Scholars from the following fields are 
invited to c ontac t us American Studies, archaeology, art history 
and criticism, classics, comparative religion, ethics, history, 
jurisprudence, linguistics, literature, modern and classical 
language, philosophy and those areas of the social sciences that 
are largely historical or theoretical in content. Scholars are 
needed in one or all of the following areas: 

Planning Each project is developed by community 
representatives and scholars who determine humanities content, 
topics, speakers and format. 

Implementation. Scholars are asked to be speakers, panelists, 
discussion leaders and resource persons Additional duties could 
include writing paper and articles, preparing bibliographies, 
consulting on film or media projects and project research Each 
scholar would be expected to familiarize himself with the project 
and present material related to his particular discipline. 
Honoraria are paid to participants 

Evaluation. The MCH is interested in hiring scholars for project 
evaluation. The responsibilities include both following and 
attending a project and submitting written evaluations or 
programs and materials. 

These challenging opportunities are open to all Maryland 
scholars in Eastern and Western Maryland. If interested, please 
send your resume to the MCH office. 






FIGHTING, from page 7 

illusion in stage fighting, Murray said, is created by the 
performer's acting ability 

He explained, "No matter how brilliant the combat, a death is 
not convincing without the reflection of pain in the actor's face. 
The actor mus learn to respond to each blow that comes his way 
-- with mirroring the pain and disappointment, the illusion of the 
fight is ruined " 

The evening was culminated by a frighteningly realistic 
enactment of the duel between Tybalt and Mercutio from 
Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. The duel was choreographed by 
Steve Hall, who, as Mercutio, was felled by the master 
swordsman, Tybalt The ten-minute duel allowed Shelton and 
Hall to fully demonstrate the stunts and prowess instilled by their 
instructor, who watched proudly from the sidelines. 

The remaining three parts of Essex's "Brush Up Your 
Shakespeare" included three June forums on the following 
topics: "How Shakespeare's Plays Hold a Mirror up to the Times" 
and "Visual Aspects of the Theatre"; "Shakespeare's Theatre 
lllustrated"-a slide presentation and discussion, and 
"Interpretations of Romeo and Juliet and The Taming of the 
Shrew. " 

Project Director, William P. Ellis, said that the project's theme 
was chosen in conjunction with the college Cockpit Theatre's 
summer productions of Romeo and Juliet, The Taming of the 
Shrew, West Side Story and Kiss Me Kate. 




Ken Shelton convincingly doubles over "in pain." 



The Maryland Committee for the Humanities, Inc. 
330 North Charles Street, Room 306 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



Dr Robert A Corngan Chairman 

Or Carolvnn Reid Wallace. Vice Chairwomen 

Mr H Michael Rvan. Jr Fiscal Officer 

Mr George Allen 

Mrs Margaret D Armstrong 

Dr Fontaine M Belford 

Dr Andrew Billingslev 

Eugene 8 Brodv. M D. 

Dr Joseph W Cox 

Dr Thomas Cripps 

Dr. David C Driskell 

Mrs Mae E Dyson 

Mr JohnM Klaus 

Dr Ruth M Oltman 

Dr Gerald J Pannick 

Mr George A Piendak 

Mr GarnieA Poison 

Mr John D Roth 

Dr A J R Russell-Wood 

Dr Don Smith 

Mrs Betry L Ustun 

Dr William H Wroten, Jr. 

Maria Heyssel, Executive Director 

Patricia L Hunt, Assistant Director 



Dr. H.;Joanne Harvar, 
Dir. of Libraries 
Univ. of Md. College Park 
College Park, Md. 20742 



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